dispensable


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dispensable

(dĭ-spĕn′sə-bəl)
adj.
Capable of being dispensed, administered, or distributed: dispensable drugs.

dis·pens′a·bil′i·ty, dis·pens′a·ble·ness n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, the vast majority of the staph pan-genome was dispensable, and more variable across strains; 39 percent were deemed "accessory," meaning they were present in some but not all strains, and 42 percent "unique," meaning they were found in only one strain.
There seems to be a clear public policy stance that Coventry should become a City of Rugby and that, by implication, seems to mean that the football club may become dispensable.
"It appears that the Scottish Government view general practice as dispensable."
The dispensable pads easily conform to complex and unevenly shaped substrates, and are asserted to reduce material costs from 30 to 60 percent.
The dispensable nation; American foreign policy in retreat.
The Chinese are looking to the region--from Pakistan and Iran to Saudi Arabia and Turkey--to help supply their vast needs for energy and products, said Nasr, author of "The Dispensable Nation," which critiques the Obama Aministration's foreign policy.
As the world crawls out from the trenches of the Great Recession, people are coming into contact -- many for the first time in three or four years -- with some dispensable income.
"When a priest fails to keep celibacy, that man-made rule that even the Roman Catholic Church admits is changeable, adaptable and dispensable, we should not be so easily scandalized," Cutie wrote.
In an era of i40-character limits on Twitter, articles are dispensable, said Interpublic Group of Co.
So, how do you avoid becoming a "no-name," dispensable entity?
Until nowit was dispensable, however, Italy now is absolutely convinced of supporting the establishment of a Palestinian state, therefore there should be an Italian center in Palestine alongside the one in Tel Aviv.' Frattini stressedthat the opening ofthis center is a ' practical sign and a proof of the attention given by the Italian politicstothe Palestinian Territory.' F.R.
All this raises the question: at what point will you become dispensable? That question begets another one: why would you want to become dispensable?