dismiss

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dismiss

Etymology: L, dis + mittere, to send
(in law) to discharge or dispose of an action, suit, or motion trial. dismissal, n.

dismiss

(dis-mis′) [L. dimissus, dismissus, sent away]
In law, to end a legal dispute without a trial, e.g., because the judge rules that the accusation does not merit consideration.
dismissal (-mis′ăl)
References in periodicals archive ?
YOUR PERFECT MATCH: Another secure individual, but you'd also thrive in a relationship with an anxious or dismissive partner, so the world's your oyster.
Those high in avoidance but low in anxiety were classified as dismissive.
In EoM and my other work, I try to get people to see that it is not essential science per se (we need not be concerned with various philosophical variations of science at this level) that has told them they are stupid and crazy, it is an attitude of people caught up in what I technically call the attitude of Dismissive Materialism.
Harry, your dismissive attitude towards the country and the culture which has hosted and provided hospitality to you is shocking.
THE major off-course firms have joined the sponsors in pricing up tomorrow's pounds 2,500 Star Racing Puppy Stakes final at Walthamstow and, without exception, are more dismissive of the chances of Roswell Starship than Star Racing.
The researchers encountered evasive corporate representatives and dismissive companies.
At worst, we get dismissive essays from successful gay authors who seem determined to disregard the bookstores that helped give them their start.
The book is a bit childlike: the teens act young for their age; the plot twists are a bit predictable; the adults are usually supportive rather than dismissive.
For example, when the book discusses natural sources of metals in the environment, it borders on being negligent and dismissive.
Portraiture, allegory, still life, anecdotal figure painting, architectural studies, and even equestrian imagery were investigated anew--not in a mocking or dismissive manner, but rather as still-potent types, the collective weight of which it now seems impossible for a contemporary painter to transcend or otherwise escape.
Investors also were dismissive of the widespread use of golden parachutes, or contractual arrangements that provide executives with financial protection in the event of a takeover.
He loved the collaborative effort of designing and constructing and was dismissive of the false assumption that architects as individuals are endowed with all the multi-functional skills required to undertake complex projects.