dismiss

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dismiss

Etymology: L, dis + mittere, to send
(in law) to discharge or dispose of an action, suit, or motion trial. dismissal, n.

dismiss

(dis-mis′) [L. dimissus, dismissus, sent away]
In law, to end a legal dispute without a trial, e.g., because the judge rules that the accusation does not merit consideration.
dismissal (-mis′ăl)
References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, it is indeed a breach of military rules and possible a dismissible offence for a US soldier to insult his commanding officer (President Obama).
Tele-presence reduces fully acted out rhetoric into mere rhetoricity, easily dismissible in an era when people are information-weary and image-numb.
China's January CPI , while dismissible partly due to seasonal issues, came in higher at an awkward 4.
Or one might have seen an elegant but easily dismissible take on familiar "death of the author" strategies.
As Table 2 shows, the average indemnity paid to the plaintiff is not an extremely large amount, but is not dismissible either.
He started us off with an amuse bouche of his version of peking duck: small crispy flakes of duck with some greens which was tasty but dismissible in comparison to the next course.
Their publications, so easily dismissible as mere mass-market drivel, seem to bear the traces of this encounter between competing epistemes, and this lend the works a melancholy quality that flies in the face of their purpose and the celebratory publicity efforts attached to them.
3) For no apparent reason dismissible and missable have different spellings of the -ble suffix.
Rauh understood better than most the significance of such efforts, easily dismissible as sideshows given that party platforms were nonbinding and usually boilerplate.
What is dangerous about Kaylan's and Horne's arguments is that they are too easily dismissible as merely the political (and overly emotional) "opinions" of a conservative elite, but their opinions are not aberrations, just as HB 2281 is not an exception to the current political climate at the national level.
Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman John Kerry said it was important not to "overhype" raw intelligence field reports, some of them "completely dismissible," others "unreliable.
In fact, the Davos incident is significant not because it demonstrates that Israel can be criticized, but rather because it was TurkeyAuand not any other easily dismissible partyAuthat dared to voice such criticism.