dismiss

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dismiss

Etymology: L, dis + mittere, to send
(in law) to discharge or dispose of an action, suit, or motion trial. dismissal, n.

dismiss

(dis-mis′) [L. dimissus, dismissus, sent away]
In law, to end a legal dispute without a trial, e.g., because the judge rules that the accusation does not merit consideration.
dismissal (-mis′ăl)
References in classic literature ?
I spoke of Polina's outburst, of my encounter with the Baron, of my dismissal, of the General's extraordinary pusillanimity, and of the call which De Griers had that morning paid me.
No dismissal followed; on the contrary, Bertha seemed to be silently putting up with personal inconveniences from the exhibitions of this woman's temper.
It was Mary's hope and belief that he had received a positive dismissal from Henrietta, and her husband lived under the constant dependence of seeing him to-morrow.
This had all the air of being a formula of dismissal, as if her next words would be that I might take myself off now that she had had the amusement of looking on the face of such a monster of indiscretion.
Soon he began to purposely neglect his studies and to disregard his duties, his aim being to secure his dismissal from the United States service.
They came therefore to a decision, betook themselves in a body to the king, and begged for their dismissal.
Catherine sometimes started at the boldness of her own surmises, and sometimes hoped or feared that she had gone too far; but they were supported by such appearances as made their dismissal impossible.
He was growing used now to the long waiting at the back of a shop on the chance that he would be taken on, and the curt dismissal.
After his dismissal from headquarters Zherkov had not remained in the regiment, saying he was not such a fool as to slave at the front when he could get more rewards by doing nothing on the staff, and had succeeded in attaching himself as an orderly officer to Prince Bagration.
Charlie certainly did not take his dismissal as Anne's imaginary rejected suitors did.
To communicate this explanation to Lady Lydiard would, in her present humor, be simply to produce the dismissal of the steward from her service.
There was no alternative but to grant her dismissal.