dismiss


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Wikipedia.

dismiss

Etymology: L, dis + mittere, to send
(in law) to discharge or dispose of an action, suit, or motion trial. dismissal, n.

dismiss

(dis-mis′) [L. dimissus, dismissus, sent away]
In law, to end a legal dispute without a trial, e.g., because the judge rules that the accusation does not merit consideration.
dismissal (-mis′ăl)
References in periodicals archive ?
Byrd's surprise decision the day before to rally support for the motion to dismiss the charges.
A debate on whether to dismiss the charges will be held at the same time a proposal to call a set number of witnesses is discussed.
Morales' lawyer said prosecutors' argument would allow arbitrary use of state procedural rules to dismiss appeals filed in federal court.
A juvenile court judge denied a defense request in June to dismiss the case against the boy.
Tuffree's public defenders, however, did win a motion to dismiss one charge against Tuffree, a motion that wasn't opposed by prosecutors.
On September 3, 1998, a motion to dismiss was filed on behalf of all federal defendants.
Lewis granted a defense motion to dismiss the lawsuit after attorneys for the former officer, Debbra Accardi, completed their case Thursday.
On March 23, 1999, the Board filed a motion to dismiss or for summary judgment.