dismiss


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dismiss

Etymology: L, dis + mittere, to send
(in law) to discharge or dispose of an action, suit, or motion trial. dismissal, n.

dismiss

(dis-mis′) [L. dimissus, dismissus, sent away]
In law, to end a legal dispute without a trial, e.g., because the judge rules that the accusation does not merit consideration.
dismissal (-mis′ăl)
References in periodicals archive ?
Byrd's surprise decision the day before to rally support for the motion to dismiss the charges.
A debate on whether to dismiss the charges will be held at the same time a proposal to call a set number of witnesses is discussed.
Morales' lawyer said prosecutors' argument would allow arbitrary use of state procedural rules to dismiss appeals filed in federal court.
The decision to dismiss this frivolous lawsuit is absolutely on target and not only makes sense but is legally sound," said Jay Sekulow, Chief Counsel of the ACLJ.
A juvenile court judge denied a defense request in June to dismiss the case against the boy.
Tuffree's public defenders, however, did win a motion to dismiss one charge against Tuffree, a motion that wasn't opposed by prosecutors.
On September 3, 1998, a motion to dismiss was filed on behalf of all federal defendants.
Lewis granted a defense motion to dismiss the lawsuit after attorneys for the former officer, Debbra Accardi, completed their case Thursday.
The Court granted the Company's motion to dismiss WWE's Robinson-Patman and Sherman Act claims, but denied the Company's motion to dismiss directed to the sufficiency of WWE's allegation of a RICO enterprise.
The Torrentspy search engine today defended itself against a copyright lawsuit supported by the MPAA and brought by the major Hollywood studios by filing a Motion to Dismiss the lawsuit in Federal Court in Los Angeles.
On March 23, 1999, the Board filed a motion to dismiss or for summary judgment.