disjunction


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

disjunction

 [dis-junk´shun]
the act or state of being disjoined. In genetics, the moving apart of bivalent chromosomes at the first anaphase of meiosis.

dis·junc·tion

(dis-jŭnk'shŭn),
The normal separation of pairs of chromosomes at the anaphase stage of meiosis I or II.
[dis- + L. junctio, a joining, fr. jungo, pp. junctum, to join]

disjunction

/dis·junc·tion/ (-junk´shun)
1. the act or state of being disjoined.
2. in genetics, the moving apart of bivalent chromosomes at the first anaphase of meiosis.

craniofacial disjunction  Le Fort III fracture.

disjunction

(dĭs-jŭngk′shən)
n.
1. The act of disjoining or the condition of being disjointed.
2. Logic
a. See exclusive disjunction.
b. See inclusive disjunction.
3. Genetics The separation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis.

disjunction

[disjungk′shən]
Etymology: L, disjungere, to disjoint
the separation of paired homologous chromosomes during anaphase of the first meiotic division, or the separation of the chromatids of a chromosome during anaphase of mitosis and the second meiotic division. Compare nondisjunction.

dis·junc·tion

(dis-jŭngk'shŭn)
The normal separation of pairs of chromosomes at the anaphase stage of meiosis I or II.
The normal separation of pairs of chromosomes at the anaphase stage of meiosis I or II.
[dis- + L. junctio, a joining, fr. jungo, pp. junctum, to join]

disjunction

The separation movement of members of pairs of chromosomes to opposite poles of a cell in the process of cell division.

disjunction

the separation of HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES to opposite poles during anaphase of nuclear division, particularly MEIOSIS. Abnormalities in disjunction (see NONDISJUNCTION can lead to a chromosomal mutation in which daughter cells possess too many or too few chromosomes. In humans extra AUTOSOMES can result in severely abnormal individuals (see DOWN'S SYNDROME, PATAU SYNDROME, EDWARDS'SYNDROME). See also TURNER'S SYNDROME and KLINEFELTER'S SYNDROME for disjunction abnormalities affecting the SEX CHROMOSOMES.

disjunction

the act or state of being disjoined. In genetics, the moving apart of bivalent chromosomes at the first anaphase of meiosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
To look ahead, however, the central point of my critique is that if a mental type P is identical with the disjunction of three physical realizations A [disjunction] B [disjunction] C, then indeed the indiscernibility of identicals requires that either P be a non-type if A [disjunction] B [disjunction] C is not a type, or that A [disjunction] B [disjunction] C be a type if P is a type; but there is an ambiguity here: P is a mental type and A [disjunction] B [disjunction] C is not a physical type.
The direction for a response to the second disjunction regarding the mode of the church's work as teacher is also illumined in the faint glimmer of the new dawn.
At the same time, it accounts for the difference between an instance of excluded middle and a disjunction such as 'Either there will be a sea battle tomorrow or it will rain tomorrow'.
The graphic effect of these disjunctions would also be evident if the switch were to be made at the end of years three and four, though to a lesser extent, since both the WHO and UK centiles begin to converge after 24 months.
Here I consider that conjunction and disjunction are commutative connectives.
The result is perhaps more musicologically interesting than musically compelling; despite the clear influences of local musical traditions on the Mass itself, the disjunction between the lighthearted--and sometimes downright vulgar--songs and the traditional Mass sections is sometimes a bit jarring.
Contemporary gluttons for punishment further exchange truth for a lie, worship the creature, and are stripped at an even deeper level: they lose God-given protection from the disjunction within man, personally and socially, of love and life.
The department's munitions requirements process provides varied answers for current munitions acquisitions questions because of the aforementioned disjunction.
In addition, we should note the ever-present gap between ideal principles and real practices as well as the inevitable disjunction between modern environmental problems and traditional religious resources.
Whereas the surprise value of a conjunction is based on that of its most surprising component, the surprise value of a disjunction is based on the least surprising element (the other exerting no direct role).
A corrosive disjunction has developed between two mutually exclusive visions of church: as a sacramental community or as a hierarchy.
We focus specifically on `disjunctive constraints', that is, constraints which have the form of the disjunction of two constraints of specified types.