inheritance

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inheritance

 [in-her´ĭ-tans]
1. the acquisition of characters or qualities by transmission from parent to offspring.
2. that which is transmitted from parent to offspring; see also gene, deoxyribonucleic acid, and heredity.
intermediate inheritance inheritance in which the phenotype of the heterozygote falls between that of the two homozygotes.
maternal inheritance the transmission of characters that are dependent on peculiarities of the egg cytoplasm produced, in turn, by nuclear genes.

in·her·i·tance

(in-her'i-tans),
1. Characters or qualities that are transmitted from parent to offspring by coded cytologic data; that which is inherited.
2. Cultural or legal endowment.
3. The act of inheriting.
[L. heredito, inherit, fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

inheritance

(ĭn-hĕr′ĭ-təns)
n.
1.
a. The action of inheriting something: the inheritance of property from a relative.
b. Something inherited or to be inherited: Her inheritance included a large estate.
2. Something regarded as a heritage: the cultural inheritance of Rome.
3. Biology
a. The process of genetic transmission of characteristics from parent or ancestor to offspring.
b. A characteristic so inherited.
c. The sum of genetically transmitted characteristics.

in·her·i·tance

(in-her'i-tăns)
1. Characters or qualities that are transmitted from parent to offspring by coded cytologic data; that which is inherited.
2. Cultural or legal endowment.
3. The act of inheriting.
[L. heredito, inherit, fr. heres (hered-), an heir]

inheritance

1. The acquisition of a particular set of genes (GENOME) from the entire series of a person's forebears, by way of an equal number of genes from each parent.
2. The characteristics transmitted in this way.

inheritance

  1. the acquisition of characteristics by the transfer of genetic material from ancestor to descendant.
  2. the total of characters in the fertilized ovum.

inheritance

The acquisition of traits, characteristics and disorders from parents to their children by transmission of genetic information. Genes come in pairs: one originating from the father, the other from the mother. If an individual presents only the hereditary characteristics determined by one gene of the pair on an autosomal chromosome, that gene is called dominant. Conditions caused by such genes are said to show autosomal dominant inheritance. For instance, for a rare autosomal dominant disease, if one parent is affected, then on average about 50% of their children will also be affected, irrespective of the children's sex. Examples: Marfan's syndrome, congenital stationary night blindness, neurofibromatosis 1 and 2, von Hippel-Lindau disease. If the individual does not present the hereditary characteristics unless both genes in a pair are of the same type, then the gene is called recessive. Conditions caused by such genes are said to show autosomal recessive inheritance. For a rare autosomal recessive disease, if a child is affected, then on average about 25% of their siblings will also be affected, irrespective of their sex. Examples: Laurence-Moon-Biedl syndrome, Tay-Sachs disease, oculocutaneous albinism, galactokinase deficiency.Thirdly, inheritance may be controlled by genes on one of the sex chromosomes, most often the X chromosome. A recessive mutation on the single X chromosome carried by a male will cause a disease, whereas in the female, a recessive X chromosome mutation would have to be carried on both of her X chromosomes. Therefore in X-linked recessive inheritance (sex-linked recessive inheritance) males are affected more often than females. Examples: colour blindness, ocular albinism, choroideremia. A fourth type of inheritance considered in ophthalmic practice is mitochondrial (maternal) inheritance in which the inheritance of a trait encoded in the mitochondrial DNA is transmitted through the female line (mother to son or mother to daughter). Examples: Leber's hereditary optic atrophy; Kearns-Sayre syndrome. See acquired; chromosome; defective colour vision; gene; hereditary.
Table I5 Divisions of the infrared spectrum
IR-A (near)780-1400 nm
IR-B (middle)1400-3000 nm
IR-C (far)3000-1 000 000 nm

Patient discussion about inheritance

Q. Is Autism hereditary? My 3 year old son has been diagnosed with autism last year. I am now pregnant with my second child and am scared that he will too have autism.

A. There is a higher chance that your additional children will have autism too, however its not a given. Be more alert and notice any early signs that your child may develop.

Q. Is Leukemia hereditary? My Grandpa died of Leukemia when he was 50. I am worried that it might be hereditary. Is it?

A. Overall leukemia is not hereditary but there are rare reports of family clusters, that is, more than one case in a family. Therefore, you should consult your Doctor and tell him about your family's medical history.

Q. Is migraine hereditary? If both my parents suffer from migraines does it mean I can't avoid it?

A. Yes, migraines do have a very strong genetic correlation. However, it does not mean that if both your parents have it, you will have it too for 100%. It means only that you have a much higher risk than the regular population, that does not have migraines in their family, to suffer from this condition.

More discussions about inheritance
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to these general but jurisdiction-dependent approaches to traditional forfeiture clauses, there are several categories of will challenges that historically have not triggered disinheritance, regardless of whether the contestant had sufficient reason to file a lawsuit.
unintentional disinheritance. If a testator executes a will and
A negative will can figure into schemes to accomplish estate planning objectives separate and apart from the goal of disinheritance. Focused on that goal, statutory drafters have almost certainly overlooked potential misapplications, and a well-drafted statute authorizing negative wills ought to preclude parties from using the device for any purpose other than the intended one of modifying substantive succession rights; lawmakers might sanction other purposes, of course, but they demand independent appraisal of public policy.
The lower percentage that a wife receives can be partially explained by the fact that Shari'a protects all heirs from disinheritance, not only the wife.
In the second part of his analysis, Kottman moves from disinheritance to possible solutions, or at least to meaningful reactions.
(2) Economic negation opens the novel with Sir Hugh's disinheritance of Camilla, producing her novel-long need for money and animating most of the story's narrative tension.
In this article, we examine the legislation and review some of the factors the courts consider relevant in deciding whether the disinheritance should be permitted.
But the overdetermination that located a cultural sense of disinheritance in a disempowerment of the father made it easy to believe that it had been; and before long distressing phenomena from the morcellement of land to the drop in natality were being attributed to the abandonment of patrilinear succession.
We can define partible inheritance as being that portion from the inheritance that is proper to the heirs who are entitled to a portion of an estate in accordance with the law and the person that leaves the inheritance cannot dispose of through gifts inter vivos (donations) or through testamentary dispositions causa mortis (related to disinheritance) (1).
entitlement--an act of unjust disinheritance towards future citizens.
You should be aware that your son may try to challenge the disinheritance.