disenfranchise

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disenfranchise

verb To deprive of a right or entitlement.
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References in periodicals archive ?
While pledging not to disfranchise any whites, they advocated provisions that would remove the less educated, less organized, more impoverished whites from the electorate as well--and that would ensure one-party, Democratic rule, which is precisely what happened from this moment forward through most of the 20th century in the South.
He boldly admitted that the purpose of the 1895 South Carolina constitution was to disfranchise African Americans.
Knox, the former chairman of the State Democratic Executive Committee who had presided over the constitutional convention, admitted that the "true philosophy of the movement" had been to disfranchise blacks and poor whites in order to "place the power of government in the hands of the intelligent and virtuous" (quoted on p.
As the leading study of this referendum concludes, unless blacks voted overwhelmingly to disfranchise themselves, these counties almost certainly engaged in the familiar practice of "counting in" the black vote: "almost every eligible Negro was `voted' although thousands never appeared at the polls."(78) Holmes, confident he understood the ways of the world even in his first few months on the Court, was simply wrong that the Alabama Constitution of 1901 reflected the fact, let alone the unalterable fact, that "the great mass of the white population intends to keep the blacks from voting." Whether that was so or not, the constitution Holmes was asked to judge hardly provided conclusive evidence of that "realistic" fact.
"Now we submit that by the same course of reasoning these gentlemen might speedily and completely disfranchise themselves and not allow themselves to vote for a member of the Legislature or indeed any other officers." In a word, if they did not vote for this measure, the town's leadership might see to it that landless men would lose their vote altogether.(37)
The Bush camp then played an ugly card by accusing Democrats, who were following the traditional practice of carefully vetting overseas absentee ballots, of seeking to disfranchise the men and women of the armed forces.
(On November 7 Massachusetts brought a long, progressive history to an end by voting to disfranchise convicted felons.) Disfranchised felons and ex-felons now number roughly 4 million, most of them black or Hispanic.
Sources inside the ruling PPP told that the government would never commit the mistake to disfranchise the parliament and opposition parties would be taken into confidence over any resolution.