disenfranchise


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disenfranchise

verb To deprive of a right or entitlement.
References in periodicals archive ?
It would disenfranchise Welsh voters from issues that only affect England.
We must ensure that polling locations are accessible to all Americans, but using the ADA to close polling stations right before an election without providing alternatives will disenfranchise voters and fail to help those with disabilities exercise their right to vote, the senators wrote.
"Rick Perry should apologize for wasting taxpayer money to disenfranchise Texans."
The LWV of Arizona reports that since Arizona became the first state to require proof of citizenship to register to vote after the November 2004 passage of a citizens' initiative vigorously opposed by the League, it has been very active in making sure that the implementation of this requirement does not disenfranchise eligible voters.
From the outright cheating and badly formatted debates, to the entire financial and political structure that makes for a wholly uneven playing field for candidates and voters alike, our electoral process is an embarrassment to a nation that calls itself the "Greatest Democracy on Earth:' We did much in the last election to get out the vote, but what we need most--through coalitions with labor, women's and civil rights groups and others who also lost big last November 2--is to push for profound reform of the electoral process itself, to get big money out and remove the barriers that purposely disenfranchise likely liberal voters.
The seculars and the misguided Catholics who attempt to disenfranchise Catholics from the political process usually end up by opposing what is truly reasonable, while imposing their own faith agendas.
At the March 11 meeting of SAG's national board, CEO Robert Pisano predicted that if the revised master Franchise agreement is not approved, one or more of the Big Five agencies would disenfranchise. That would mean essentially telling SAG to go to hell by no longer following any SAG rules.
The Sentencing Project and Human Rights Watch estimate that "in states that disenfranchise ex-felons, 40 percent of the next generation of black men is likely to lose permanently the right to vote."
All but four states - Maine, Massachusetts, Utah, and Vermont - disenfranchise incarcerated offenders.
The MPN chairman also called on INEC not to disenfranchise the people of the southern senatorial district in the rescheduled inconclusive National Assembly election in the area.
The act prohibits laws or electoral processes that disenfranchise blacks and other minorities.