disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs

dis·ease-mod·i·fy·ing an·ti·rheu·ma·tic drugs

(DMARD) (di-zēz'mod'i-fī-ing an'tē-rū-mat'ik drŭgz)
Agents that apparently alter the course and progression of rheumatoid arthritis, as opposed to more rapidly acting substances that suppress inflammation and decrease pain, but do not prevent cartilage or bone erosion or progressive disability.

dis·ease-mod·i·fy·ing an·ti·rheu·ma·tic drugs

(DMARD) (di-zēz'mod'i-fī-ing an'tē-rū-mat'ik drŭgz)
Agents that alter the course and progression of rheumatoid arthritis.
References in periodicals archive ?
People whose psoriasis was treated with tofacitinib (Xeljanz) had a two- to threefold increased risk of herpes zoster, compared with those treated with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors or conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs).
The researchers matched 59,627 patients who received the herpes zoster vaccine with 119,254 unvaccinated patients, based on age, sex, race, calendar year, autoimmune disease type, and use of autoimmune drugs (biologics, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and glucocorticoids).
However, new data allowed the task force to recommend not to treat patients with hand OA with conventional synthetic or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs).
While there is no cure for RA--an autoimmune disease that affects more than 1.3 million Americans--treatment with powerful therapies such as biologic or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs can lead to remission of symptoms.
In 2017, Xeljanz, in combination with methotrexate, or MTX, was first approved by the EC for the treatment of moderate to severe active rheumatoid arthritis in adult patients who have responded inadequately to, or who are intolerant to one or more disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, and as monotherapy in case of intolerance to MTX or when treatment with MTX is inappropriate.2 In June 2018, Xeljanz, in combination with MTX, was approved by the EC for the treatment of active psoriatic arthritis in adult patients who have had an inadequate response or who have been intolerant to a prior DMARD therapy.
Scientists analysed the records of patients taking disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and those who were not.
Meanwhile, patients continue to take their previous medicines - traditional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs).
In the last decade, there have been significant advances in the treatment of RA, especially for patients whose arthritis does not respond to conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs).
(NYSE: PFE) approval for Xeljanz 5 mg twice daily and Xeljanz XR (tofacitinib) extended release 11 mg once daily for the treatment of adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis who have had an inadequate response or intolerance to methotrexate or other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), the company said.
announced today that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved XELJANZ 5 mg twice daily (BID) and XELJANZ XR (tofacitinib) extended release 11 mg once daily (QD) for the treatment of adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who have had an inadequate response or intolerance to methotrexate or other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs).
The findings are encouraging because patients with rheumatoid arthritis have a higher risk of developing shingles than other adults, and tofacitinib and certain other disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are thought to further increase this risk.
Most participants in the study had longstanding RA and were taking disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Patients filled in a food frequency questionnaire that detailed their diet over the previous year, and their frequency of fish consumption was analysed in relation to RA activity.