discontinuation

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discontinuation

The act of concluding participation, before completing all protocol-required elements, in a trial by an enrolled subject. Subject discontinuation does not necessarily imply exclusion of the subject’s data from analysis.

Categories of discontinuation
• Dropout—Discontinuation of a trial by a subject or the discontinued subject him- or herself.
• Investigator initiated discontinuation (e.g., for cause).
• Loss to follow-up—Cessation of participation without notice or action by the subject.
• Sponsor initiated.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both the access to and composition of available methods were associated with a reduction in the relevant discontinuation rate.
CONCLUSIONS: High contraceptive discontinuation in the past has contributed tens of millions of cases of unmet need, and discontinuation among current users will contribute even more cases in the future.
A 1989 simulation analysis illustrated the importance of high contraceptive discontinuation to contraceptive prevalence.
Three outcome variables were used in this analysis: current use of a modern contraceptive method, method mix and contraceptive discontinuation resulting in unmet need.
Among all women who were using contraception in the year before the pregnancy, the single main reason for discontinuation was the desire to become pregnant (45%); however, contraceptive failure accounted for 32% of discontinuations, and side effects (8%) and health concerns (3%) combined accounted for 11%.
Overall, one of every five mistimed pregnancies and one of every six unwanted pregnancies followed discontinuations for reasons other than to become pregnant.
This study found that a large proportion of discontinuations preceding pregnancies were due to contraceptive failures.
Association between contraceptive discontinuation and pregnancy intentions in Guatemala
Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to examine the characteristics of women who reported births as intended when they followed contraceptive failure or discontinuation for reasons other than a desire for pregnancy.
RESULTS: The proportion of births reported as intended following contraceptive failure ranged from 16% in Bangladesh to 54% in Kazakhstan, and the proportion reported as intended following discontinuation for reasons other than a desire for pregnancy ranged from 37% in Kenya to 51% in Kazakhstan.
CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that underlying variation in the motivation to avoid pregnancy is an important factor in contraceptive discontinuation.
1), (2) Analyses of survey data have demonstrated that contraceptive discontinuation is common.