discography

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diskography

 [dis-kog´rah-fe]
radiography of the vertebral column after injection of radiopaque material into an intervertebral disk.

dis·cog·ra·phy

(dis-kog'ră-fē),
Historically, radiographic demonstration of intervertebral disk by injection of contrast media into the nucleus pulposus.
[disco- + G. graphō, to write]

diskography

, discography (dis-kog′ră-fē) [ disk + -graphy]
Use of a contrast medium injected into an intervertebral disk so that it can be examined radiographically.

CAUTION!

Diskography may increase the risk of disk degeneration and herniation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The discographies at the end of each chapter and the eighty pages of back matter demonstrate Reid's commitment to disseminating well-researched, factual information about the Stanley Brothers.
(37) On the other hand, in the volumes of The German National Discography the discographies are arranged to the performers and then chronologically to recording sessions, so the two aspects are somehow mixed.
His closing chapter about the present state of jazz discography may be a little difficult for some readers because of the technical descriptions of the computer programs used to prepare some discographies. The patient reader will be rewarded with a glimpse of the legal issues that may affect future compilations.
The problems associated with standardizing discographies are well documented.
The computer age has seen the introduction of jazz discographies on CD-ROM as well as the Internet.
(e.g., "Discographies are essential to the study of music because recorded performances are integral to research and performance," p.
The discographies are also alphabetized by composer, and each entry includes an alphanumeric code used for cross-referencing from the bibliographies, title, soloist(s), orchestra and conductor, label name (abbreviated) and catalog number, and reference to which of the three recording catalogs provided the information.
Bolig is best known for his discographies of the recordings of the Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (John R.
The recent release of two comprehensive discographies on CD-ROM covering all or most of the recorded history of jazz marks a watershed in music research.
As noted in his preface to Caruso Records, the 1973 discography contained no surprises but rather was noteworthy for its "comprehensiveness and organization." In contrast to earlier Caruso discographies, most arranged alphabetically by composer, Bolig's offered a chronological listing.