discipline

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discipline

A UK term of art for an allied health profession which requires formal training, leading to a recognised professional qualification.

Examples
Physiotherapy, nursing, pharmacology.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

discipline

A branch or domain of knowledge, instruction, or learning. Nursing, medicine, physical therapy, and social work are examples of health-related or professional disciplines. History, sociology, psychology, chemistry, and physics are examples of academic disciplines.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
I had no idea what she was talking about," Another, after correcting her supervisor's facts, stated, "She just said, 'Oh." She didn't even apologize." These are contrasted with a comment regarding a male discipliner, "He stopped me from doing it again, but he didn't crush my spirit." Recipients were more likely to see the discipline as unfair (supporting Hie) and were less likely to accept responsibility for their behavior when the supervisor was female (supporting H1f).
En somme, l'espace des aspirants professionnels, c'est aussi le monde des elus virtuels, de ceux qui pourront gagner, parce qu'ils jouent contre des joueurs qui, eux, n'etudieraient pas les strategies, n'observeraient pas de regles, ne sauraient pas se discipliner et passeraient leur temps a << tilter >>.
Until women and men are understood as true equals and the attitudes and beliefs that maintain these power structures (including the norms that keep men as the unquestioned 'decision makers', 'discipliners', and 'heads' and women as 'subservient', 'docile' and 'obedient' (the servers of men) are unlearnt and dismantled, GBV will continue.
The emphasis on ACIJs as supervisors and discipliners reflects the well-publicized concern over abusive and intemperate behavior by some IJs--those Professor Legomsky calls the "bad apples." (140) Part of any chief judge's job is dealing with judicial misconduct--by looking for its causes and seeking individual remedies, from counseling to public reprimands to reporting the judge to a disciplinary body.
If not a victory for the oppressed--or the oppressors--the death of the adviser at least signals that the vicious, the discipliners do not always win, will not always triumph over the freedoms, ideals, and languages of others.