disciform


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dis·ci·form

(disk'i-fōrm),
Disc-shaped.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

disciform

(dĭs′ə-fôrm′, dĭs′kə-)
adj.
Flat and rounded in shape; discoid.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dis·ci·form

(dis'ki-fōrm)
Disc-shaped.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Capitula homogamous or heterogamous, discoid, disciform, ligulate, or radiate, isomorphic or heteromorphic with dimorphic, sub-dimorphic, or rarely with trimorphic florets, with one to numerous florets; receptacle epaleate to paleate, glabrous, pilose, setose to fimbriate; involucre uniseriate to multiseriate.
Capitulescences monocephalous, on scapes; capitula heterogamous, disciform or radiate, chasmogamous or cleistogamous, erect or nodding; receptacle epaleate; involucre multiseriate.
Presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome (POHS) was first described in 1959 by Woods and Wahlen (1) as peripheral chorioretinal scar and hemorrhagic macular disciform lesion in a patient with positive histoplasmin skin test.
Capitulescences monocephalous, on scapes; capitula heterogamous, disciform; receptacle epaleate; involucre multiseriate.
Capitulescences monocephalous or in loose to dense apical cymes; capitula short-pedunculate, homogamous, discoid or disciform; receptacle epaleate; involucre multiseriate.
Anjioid streaks and disciform macular detachment in Paget's Diseases.
The exclusion criteria for both groups were presence of other concurrent retinal pathologies and presence of disciform scars.
Pathogenesis of disciform detachment of the neuroepithelium, II idiopathic central serous choroidopathy.
* Disciform: A capitulum with at least two types of tubular disk flowers (for example: hermaphroditic and female) but lacking ray flowers (Bremer, 1994).
Another important gap is that once a patient has been treated and followed in a hospital, hospital ophthalmologists seldom refer this patient to the general ophthalmologist although they have reached a low level of vision, or a disciform scar have developed (Table 1).
The condition leads to sub-retinal disciform scarring and may even progress to vitreous haemorrhage.