discharge

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dis·charge (DC),

(dis'charj),
1. That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.
2. The activation or firing of a neuron.

discharge

/dis·charge/ (dis-chahrj´)
1. a setting free, or liberation.
2. matter or force set free.
3. an excretion or substance evacuated.
4. release from a hospital or other course of care.
5. the passing of an action potential through a neuron, axon, or muscle fibers.

myokymic discharge  patterns of grouped or repetitive discharges of motor unit action potentials sometimes seen in myokymia.
myotonic discharge  high frequency repetitive discharges seen in myotonia and evoked by insertion of a needle electrode, percussion of a muscle, or stimulation of a muscle or its motor nerve.
periodic lateralized epileptiform discharge  (PLED) a pattern of repetitive paroxysmal slow or sharp waves seen on an electroencephalogram from just one side of the brain.

discharge

(dĭs-chärj′)
v.
1. To emit a substance, as by excretion or secretion.
2. To release a patient from custody or care.
3. To generate an electrical impulse. Used of a neuron.
n. (dĭs′chärj′, dĭs-chärj′)
1. The act of releasing, emitting, or secreting.
2. A substance that is excreted or secreted.
3. The generation of an electrical impulse by a neuron.

discharge (d/c)

[dis′chärj]
Etymology: OFr, deschargier, to expel
1 v, to release a substance or object. See also evacuate, excrete, secrete.
2 v, to release a patient from a hospital.
3 v, to release an electric charge, which may be manifested by a spark or surge of electricity, from a storage battery, condenser, or other source.
4 v, to release a burst of energy from or through a neuron.
5 n, also called affective discharge, (in psychology) a release of emotions, often accompanied by a wide range of voluntary and involuntary reflexes, weeping, rage, or other emotional displays.
6 n, a substance or object discharged.
7 n, the flow of a secretion or an excretion.

discharge

Environment
noun Any material released in effluents, generally of human origin; often organic or toxic waste.
 
verb A generic term for the release of materials (e.g., radioactive, biohazardous waste) and sundry anthropogenic detritus in effluents to the air, water, or sanitary facilities.
 
Managed care
verb To formally terminate a person’s care in and release them from a hospital or healthcare facility.

Medspeak
noun A secretion or material eliminated from a wound or orifice.
 
verb To release a secretion or material from a wound or orifice.

Medspeak-UK
noun A term defined in the UK for the formal end of an episode of care.
 
Types of discharge
Day-case discharge, day-patient discharge, inpatient discharge, outpatient discharge.

verb 
(1) To formally end an episode of care.
(2) To formally end surveillance of a patient who was previously diagnosed with and treated for a condition, and who no longer requires surveillance.

Obstetrics
See Menstrual discharge.
 
Ostomy
A stoma’s output.

discharge

Managed care verb (pron. dis charj´) To formally terminate a person's care in, and releasing from, a hospital or health care facility. See Complex repetitive discharge. Cf Admit Medtalk. noun (pron. dis´ charj) A secretion or material eliminated from a wound or orifice. See Autogenic discharge, Nipple discharge, Prune juice discharge, Vaginal discharge verb To release a secretion or material from a wound or orifice.

dis·charge

(DC) (dis'chahrj)
1. That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.
2. The activation or firing of a neuron.

discharge

An abnormal outflow of body fluid, most commonly of pus mixed with normal secretions, or of normal secretions in abnormal amount. Discharge may occur from any body orifice or from a wound.

discharge

neurone activation

discharge

free exudate

dis·charge

(dis'chahrj)
That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.

discharge,

v 1. to release; liberate; annul; unburden. To cancel a contract; to make an agreement or contract null and void.
n 2. a substance that exudes from an opening.
discharge, purulent,
discharge summary,
n the clinical notes written by the discharging physician or dental professional at the time of releasing a patient from the hospital or clinic, outlining the course of treatment, the status at release, and the postdischarge expectations and instructions.

discharge

1. a setting free, or liberation.
2. material or force set free.
3. an excretion or substance evacuated.

ocular discharge
a sign of conjunctivitis; green or yellow discharge is indicative of cellular content and inflammatory response.

Patient discussion about discharge

Q. is there cause for alarm if i have a white thick discharge?

A. Hello, ruffdee, if the discharge is white, and NOT causing any itchy feeling, burn sensation, and not smelly, it probably still is in normal range.
But once you feel itchy, burning, its color turns yellowish or greenish, and it has bad smell, it might be a sign for an infection, and it is recommended then you to find a doctor to get the specific therapy to cure the infection.
"Stay healthy always.."

Q. if you've had rough sex can bleeding accur a day or two later and have a smelly discharge?

A. it is very possible to happen like that. a rough sex will most likely cause trauma in the mucosa (either it is vaginal mucosa or anal mucosa), and the bleeding can happen even after a day or two.
if you're experiencing smelly discharge, be aware of the possibility of genital infection, that's why I'll recommend you to go to a doctor to get checked, and then get the specific therapy for that.

if it is happened that you're getting genital infection, you would probably inform your sex-partner and encourage your partner to seek the same medical advice.

Stay healthy always...

More discussions about discharge
References in periodicals archive ?
But in 1991, the federal government gave less than $70 million to states for ambient water monitoring -- assessing the quality of the aquatic environment rather than studying the effect of specific discharges.
Neither NRC nor the EPA has conducted or required testing to determine the extent of the radioactive contamination occurring at treatment plants that receive radioactive discharges.
Pretreatment standards for new sources (PSNS) must be met by new indirect discharges from the beginning of their operations.
Similar to the other studies, separations were categorized as quits, layoffs and discharges.
This Frost & Sullivan research service entitled World Electrical Discharge Machines Market provides a comprehensive analysis of this market and examines its applications in various end-user segments such as the automotive, aerospace and defence industries, medical applications, and machine shops.
The interpretation of the discharges and their correlation with the physical processes behind them are very important.
The company yesterday pleaded guilty at Teesside Magistrates Court to failing to provide a discharge sample, and two charges of failing to comply with the limits of its discharge consent, at the Bran Sands effluent treatment works near the Tees estuary.
Although the trial will result in some discharges of Tc-99, the objective of the trial is to determine how effective TPP is in reducing Tc-99 from discharges.
In his letter he detailed his experiences and expressed his fear that by staying closeted in the military he would always be "at risk of investigation, involuntary discharge, and even criminal prosecution.
Environmental Protection Agency guidelines require mills to measure most effluent discharges at the bleach plant.
The plant treats 3 million gallons of raw sewage a day, which it discharges to 31 evaporation ponds.
Although a relatively quick procedure, the discharge process still takes a number of weeks to finalize and involves costs of procuring a bond and legal fees.