discharge

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dis·charge (DC),

(dis'charj),
1. That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.
2. The activation or firing of a neuron.

discharge

/dis·charge/ (dis-chahrj´)
1. a setting free, or liberation.
2. matter or force set free.
3. an excretion or substance evacuated.
4. release from a hospital or other course of care.
5. the passing of an action potential through a neuron, axon, or muscle fibers.

myokymic discharge  patterns of grouped or repetitive discharges of motor unit action potentials sometimes seen in myokymia.
myotonic discharge  high frequency repetitive discharges seen in myotonia and evoked by insertion of a needle electrode, percussion of a muscle, or stimulation of a muscle or its motor nerve.
periodic lateralized epileptiform discharge  (PLED) a pattern of repetitive paroxysmal slow or sharp waves seen on an electroencephalogram from just one side of the brain.

discharge

(dĭs-chärj′)
v.
1. To emit a substance, as by excretion or secretion.
2. To release a patient from custody or care.
3. To generate an electrical impulse. Used of a neuron.
n. (dĭs′chärj′, dĭs-chärj′)
1. The act of releasing, emitting, or secreting.
2. A substance that is excreted or secreted.
3. The generation of an electrical impulse by a neuron.

discharge (d/c)

[dis′chärj]
Etymology: OFr, deschargier, to expel
1 v, to release a substance or object. See also evacuate, excrete, secrete.
2 v, to release a patient from a hospital.
3 v, to release an electric charge, which may be manifested by a spark or surge of electricity, from a storage battery, condenser, or other source.
4 v, to release a burst of energy from or through a neuron.
5 n, also called affective discharge, (in psychology) a release of emotions, often accompanied by a wide range of voluntary and involuntary reflexes, weeping, rage, or other emotional displays.
6 n, a substance or object discharged.
7 n, the flow of a secretion or an excretion.

discharge

Environment
noun Any material released in effluents, generally of human origin; often organic or toxic waste.
 
verb A generic term for the release of materials (e.g., radioactive, biohazardous waste) and sundry anthropogenic detritus in effluents to the air, water, or sanitary facilities.
 
Managed care
verb To formally terminate a person’s care in and release them from a hospital or healthcare facility.

Medspeak
noun A secretion or material eliminated from a wound or orifice.
 
verb To release a secretion or material from a wound or orifice.

Medspeak-UK
noun A term defined in the UK for the formal end of an episode of care.
 
Types of discharge
Day-case discharge, day-patient discharge, inpatient discharge, outpatient discharge.

verb 
(1) To formally end an episode of care.
(2) To formally end surveillance of a patient who was previously diagnosed with and treated for a condition, and who no longer requires surveillance.

Obstetrics
See Menstrual discharge.
 
Ostomy
A stoma’s output.

discharge

Managed care verb (pron. dis charj´) To formally terminate a person's care in, and releasing from, a hospital or health care facility. See Complex repetitive discharge. Cf Admit Medtalk. noun (pron. dis´ charj) A secretion or material eliminated from a wound or orifice. See Autogenic discharge, Nipple discharge, Prune juice discharge, Vaginal discharge verb To release a secretion or material from a wound or orifice.

dis·charge

(DC) (dis'chahrj)
1. That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.
2. The activation or firing of a neuron.

discharge

An abnormal outflow of body fluid, most commonly of pus mixed with normal secretions, or of normal secretions in abnormal amount. Discharge may occur from any body orifice or from a wound.

discharge

neurone activation

discharge

free exudate

dis·charge

(dis'chahrj)
That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.

discharge,

v 1. to release; liberate; annul; unburden. To cancel a contract; to make an agreement or contract null and void.
n 2. a substance that exudes from an opening.
discharge, purulent,
discharge summary,
n the clinical notes written by the discharging physician or dental professional at the time of releasing a patient from the hospital or clinic, outlining the course of treatment, the status at release, and the postdischarge expectations and instructions.

discharge

1. a setting free, or liberation.
2. material or force set free.
3. an excretion or substance evacuated.

ocular discharge
a sign of conjunctivitis; green or yellow discharge is indicative of cellular content and inflammatory response.

Patient discussion about discharge

Q. is there cause for alarm if i have a white thick discharge?

A. Hello, ruffdee, if the discharge is white, and NOT causing any itchy feeling, burn sensation, and not smelly, it probably still is in normal range.
But once you feel itchy, burning, its color turns yellowish or greenish, and it has bad smell, it might be a sign for an infection, and it is recommended then you to find a doctor to get the specific therapy to cure the infection.
"Stay healthy always.."

Q. if you've had rough sex can bleeding accur a day or two later and have a smelly discharge?

A. it is very possible to happen like that. a rough sex will most likely cause trauma in the mucosa (either it is vaginal mucosa or anal mucosa), and the bleeding can happen even after a day or two.
if you're experiencing smelly discharge, be aware of the possibility of genital infection, that's why I'll recommend you to go to a doctor to get checked, and then get the specific therapy for that.

if it is happened that you're getting genital infection, you would probably inform your sex-partner and encourage your partner to seek the same medical advice.

Stay healthy always...

More discussions about discharge
References in periodicals archive ?
The gently sloping part of the pulse front also occurs due to reflections of electromagnetic waves caused by the triggering of dischargers, from various inhomogeneities in the GPVCP power line and in the launch system.
The results of discharger A4 do not correlate with those of other dischargers because sediment samples that were taken from this discharger were the most contaminated by HM during the high flow period.
That's why we prefer dischargers with a threaded base.
In Britain, the discharger cup was declared obsolete in 1947 to be replaced by a spigot discharger using finned rifle grenades, but not so in India.
PIRG and the Clean Water Network also support legislation to require dischargers to post a sign on the entrance of their facility that details what is going into the river and who people can contact for more information.
General view of the panel low-voltage lightning protection redundant type nr3H-P-3/100-220 (/m=100 kA; discharger type--Pr3H-3/100-220; impulse breakdown voltage of each of eight dischargers--4 kV; RF) [18, 37]
The lifting frame is optional on all BFC models of the company's Bulk-Out discharger line, and available for up to 2.
The low profile dischargers are engineered to straddle downstream blenders, feeders, tanks or other equipment in areas with limited headroom, restricted floor space and/or obstacles that would preclude the use of conventional discharger frames.
All of them are a big hit with consumers, but certainly the BDX battery discharger is presented as the main product of last year, becoming the company's best sellers.
The discharger would empty bulk bags into a hopper at its base, and the flexible screw conveyor would convey additives through an inclined tube to a feeder on the compounding line.
These systems, which can be an integral part of the bulk bag discharger, ensures that only material within the required specifications are delivered to the packing or processing machine.
Fraser has developed a static discharger, the EX-HPSD, which has been certified for use in hazardous areas under the European ATEX directive.