discharge

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dis·charge (DC),

(dis'charj),
1. That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.
2. The activation or firing of a neuron.

discharge

(dĭs-chärj′)
v.
1. To emit a substance, as by excretion or secretion.
2. To release a patient from custody or care.
3. To generate an electrical impulse. Used of a neuron.
n. (dĭs′chärj′, dĭs-chärj′)
1. The act of releasing, emitting, or secreting.
2. A substance that is excreted or secreted.
3. The generation of an electrical impulse by a neuron.

discharge

Environment
noun Any material released in effluents, generally of human origin; often organic or toxic waste.
 
verb A generic term for the release of materials (e.g., radioactive, biohazardous waste) and sundry anthropogenic detritus in effluents to the air, water, or sanitary facilities.
 
Managed care
verb To formally terminate a person’s care in and release them from a hospital or healthcare facility.

Medspeak
noun A secretion or material eliminated from a wound or orifice.
 
verb To release a secretion or material from a wound or orifice.

Medspeak-UK
noun A term defined in the UK for the formal end of an episode of care.
 
Types of discharge
Day-case discharge, day-patient discharge, inpatient discharge, outpatient discharge.

verb 
(1) To formally end an episode of care.
(2) To formally end surveillance of a patient who was previously diagnosed with and treated for a condition, and who no longer requires surveillance.

Obstetrics
See Menstrual discharge.
 
Ostomy
A stoma’s output.

discharge

Managed care verb (pron. dis charj´) To formally terminate a person's care in, and releasing from, a hospital or health care facility. See Complex repetitive discharge. Cf Admit Medtalk. noun (pron. dis´ charj) A secretion or material eliminated from a wound or orifice. See Autogenic discharge, Nipple discharge, Prune juice discharge, Vaginal discharge verb To release a secretion or material from a wound or orifice.

dis·charge

(DC) (dis'chahrj)
1. That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.
2. The activation or firing of a neuron.

discharge

An abnormal outflow of body fluid, most commonly of pus mixed with normal secretions, or of normal secretions in abnormal amount. Discharge may occur from any body orifice or from a wound.

dis·charge

(dis'chahrj)
That which is emitted or evacuated, as an excretion or a secretion.

Patient discussion about discharge

Q. is there cause for alarm if i have a white thick discharge?

A. Hello, ruffdee, if the discharge is white, and NOT causing any itchy feeling, burn sensation, and not smelly, it probably still is in normal range.
But once you feel itchy, burning, its color turns yellowish or greenish, and it has bad smell, it might be a sign for an infection, and it is recommended then you to find a doctor to get the specific therapy to cure the infection.
"Stay healthy always.."

Q. if you've had rough sex can bleeding accur a day or two later and have a smelly discharge?

A. it is very possible to happen like that. a rough sex will most likely cause trauma in the mucosa (either it is vaginal mucosa or anal mucosa), and the bleeding can happen even after a day or two.
if you're experiencing smelly discharge, be aware of the possibility of genital infection, that's why I'll recommend you to go to a doctor to get checked, and then get the specific therapy for that.

if it is happened that you're getting genital infection, you would probably inform your sex-partner and encourage your partner to seek the same medical advice.

Stay healthy always...

More discussions about discharge
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the 1,013 people discharged last year, 337 were aged 65-74, 367 were aged 75-84 and 309 were aged 85 or over.
North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust, which runs the University Hospital of North Tees and University Hospital of Hartlepool, discharged 1,054 patients during these night-time hours between April 1, 2011, and January 31 this year.
7 : to get rid of by paying or doing <discharge a debt> <He discharged his responsibilities.>
We found that the risk-adjusted mortality for patients discharged from ICU between 1800 and 0600 hours was higher than the population median (Figures 1 and 2) and this time interval was chosen to represent "after-hours".
And long before then, who will listen to their cries for help, or monitor what acts they commit--before they are triaged, discharged, and hung out to dry?
In this case, containers from USNS Red Cloud (a large, medium-speed, roll-on/roll-off ship) will be discharged onto Navy barges using ship-based cranes.
Investigators also found that patients who had not resumed their antihyperglycemic agents at discharge also were more likely to be discharged without receiving statins, [beta] blockers, ACE inhibitors, and aspirin.
Patients who were well enough to be discharged were sometimes waiting up to eight to ten hours to leave the hospital because of systems problems.
In addition, the circuit court concluded that material issues of fact remain with respect to whether the plaintiff had established that she was constructively discharged due to the hostile work environment and, perhaps, most important, if she was constructively discharged, whether that would amount to a tangible employment action, meaning no defense to liability could be offered.
The 950th team documented and discharged more than 300 pieces of Polish and Slovak equipment returning from a rotation in Southwest Asia in support of the Global War on Terrorism.
A particularly effective flow choke to give a big improvement in closing the neck of partially discharged bags for re-tying and removal has also been introduced.
9,500 Estimated number of gay and lesbian soldiers discharged under "don't ask, don't tell" since 1993