discharge abstract


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abstract

(ab'strakt) (ab'strakt, ab-strakt') [L. abstrahere, to draw away]
1. A summary or abridgment of an article, book, or address.
2. Intangible.

discharge abstract

Discharge summary.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this review, administrative health data sources included health insurance registries, hospital discharge abstracts, physician billing claims, emergency department records, electronic medical records, and drug and vaccine information systems.
We linked discharge abstract data with medical license data to obtain more information about physician characteristics.
The index is created in two steps using the California hospital discharge abstracts, which report patients' zip codes of residence.
The objectives of this study were to (1) perform a systematic review of hospital-based studies to identify validated ICD-9-, ICD-9-CM-, or ICD-10based AMI case definitions; (2) identify what case definitions have been used in the literature; (3) validate previously validated case definitions in dually coded ICD-9-CM and ICD-10 data through medical chart review; and (4) apply validated AMI case definitions to Canadian hospital discharge abstract data to assess the impact of various case definitions on estimates of AMI admissions and in-hospital mortality.
[1] Nonstandard abbreviations: cTn, cardiac troponin; ACS, acute coronary syndrome; hs, high-sensitivity; MI, myocardial infarction; CIHI-DAD, Canadian Institute for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database; HR, hazard ratio.
We analyzed discharge abstract data for 5.15 million discharges from all California hospitals for 1999 and 2000.
We were required to link mother's discharge abstract data, infant's discharge abstract data, and infant's birth certificate data for each delivery because each of the three data files contained different variables that were part of our analysis.
The discharge abstract of inpatients is available, but it only includes the services provided, diagnoses, and procedures for the patient.
When the study began, 16 States collected and made available computerized hospital discharge abstract data.
Other data sources included the National Council on Compensation Insurance Detailed Claim Information Database, Maryland and California statewide hospital discharge abstract data, and information from smaller studies.
Our data came from the Iowa Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program Cancer Registry, the Iowa Hospital Association (IHA) inpatient discharge abstract files, and the Census Bureau's 1990 Zip Code Summary Tape File 3B.