disc syndrome

disc syn·drome

a constellation of symptoms and signs, including pain, paresthesias, sensory loss, weakness, and impaired reflexes, due to a compressive radiculopathy caused by intervertebral disc pressure.

disc syn·drome

(disk sin'drōm)
A constellation of symptoms and signs, including pain, paresthesia, sensory loss, weakness, and impaired reflexes, due to a compressive radiculopathy caused by intervertebral disc pressure.
References in periodicals archive ?
MPS has been associated with numerous pain conditions including but not limited to migraines, computer-related disorders, pain during pregnancy, tension type headaches, radiculopathies, disc syndrome, tendonitis, spinal dysfunction, pelvic pain and osteoarthritis.
Clinically ileal osteomyelitis is distinguished in three syndromes the lumbar disc syndrome, the gluteal and the abdominal syndrome, depending upon the direction.
Anterolateral cervical disc removal and interbody fusion for cervical disc syndrome. Bull Johns Hopkins Hosp 1955;96:223-4.
She had been diagnosed with lumbar disc syndrome by a physician at Semmes Murphey Clinic (SMC).
Three complications occurred (4%) in the women who had the vaginal procedure: a rectal injury an inadvertent cystotomy, and a transient lumbar disc syndrome, all of which were repaired or cleared.
(41,42) The final 206 page report was published as a monograph titled Intervertebral Disc Syndrome. (40,41,43,44)
(64) Additionally, the Intervertebral Disc Syndrome represents what is most likely the first research publication authored by a chiropractor to ever be indexed in Index Medicus; the citation may be found by using the National Library of Medicine's NLM Gateway search engine (http://gateway.nlm.nih.gov).
A progress report on research of the intervertebral disc syndrome. Journal of the National Chiropractic Association.
Perhaps someday more sophisticated imaging will be able to detect such adaptations, potentially serving a diagnostic role in the identification of painful disc syndromes however at the present such changes are not clinically detectable.
The common causes of lower back pain include lumbar strain or sprain, nerve irritation, and degenerative bone or disc syndromes. (6) While traumatic injury is often the culprit, work- and sports-related overuse could also play a decisive role.
Moreover, the realities of normal aging (back pain, sciatica, disc syndromes, arthritis, heart disease, and just a plain fatigue and stress) all beign to erode the capabilities to sustain the same level of care given in younger years.