dissociation

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dissociation

 [dis-so″she-a´shun]
1. the act of separating or state of being separated.
2. the separation of a molecule into fragments produced by the absorption of light or thermal energy or by solvation.
3. segregation of a group of mental processes from the rest of a person's usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, perception, and sensory and motor behavior, as in the separation of personality and aspects of memory or subpersonalities in the dissociative disorders or in the segregation of an idea or object from its emotional significance, as is sometimes seen in schizophrenia.
atrial dissociation independent beating of the left and right atria, each with normal rhythm or with various combinations of normal rhythm, atrial flutter, or atrial fibrillation.
atrioventricular dissociation a condition in which the atria and the ventricles contract independently of each other, without synchronization of their rhythms.
electromechanical dissociation pulseless electrical activity.
isorhythmic atrioventricular dissociation a cardiac rhythm in which the atria and the ventricles beat independently and at approximately the same rate.

dis·so·ci·a·tion

(dis-sō'sē-ā'shŭn, -shē-ā'shŭn),
1. Separation, or a dissolution of relations. For the following chemical, biochemical, and psychiatric senses, avoid substituting the misspelling/mispronunciation dissociation.
See also: Time-Line therapy. Synonym(s): disassociation
2. The change of a complex chemical compound into simpler ones by any lytic reaction, by ionization, by heterolysis, or by homolysis.
See also: Time-Line therapy.
3. An unconscious separation of a group of mental processes from the rest, resulting in an independent functioning of these processes and a loss of the usual associations, for example, a separation of affect from cognition.
See also: Time-Line therapy.
4. A state used as an essential part of a technique for healing in psychology and psychotherapy, for instance in hypnotherapy or the neurolinguistic programming technique of Time-Line therapy.
See also: Time-Line therapy.
5. The translocation between a large chromosome and a small supernumerary one.
6. Separation of the nuclear components of a heterokaryotic dikaryon.
7. The disassembly of protomers from a larger marcomolecular complex or polymer.
[L. dis-socio, pp. -atus, to disjoin, separate, fr. socius, partner, ally]

dissociation

(dĭ-sō′sē-ā′shən, -shē-)
n.
1. The act of dissociating or the condition of having been dissociated.
2. Chemistry
a. The process by which the action of a solvent or a change in physical condition, as in pressure or temperature, causes a molecule to split into simpler groups of atoms, single atoms, or ions.
b. The separation of an electrolyte into ions of opposite charge.
3. Psychiatry A psychological defense mechanism in which specific, anxiety-provoking thoughts, emotions, or physical sensations are separated from the rest of the psyche.

dis·so′ci·a′tive (-ə-tĭv) adj.

dissociation

Cardiology Electromagnetic dissociation, see there. See also Atrioventricular dissociation, Pulse-temperature dissociation Psychiatry A mental response that diverts consciousness from painful or traumatic associations Examples Shock, numbing, paralysis, loss of speech or other sensory perception, or even loss of consciousness.

dis·so·ci·a·tion

(di-sōsē-āshŭn)
1. Separation, or a dissolution of relations.
Synonym(s): disassociation.
2. The change of a complex chemical compound into a simpler one by any lytic reaction, by ionization, by heterolysis, or by homolysis.
3. An unconscious separation of a group of mental processes from the rest, resulting in an independent functioning of these processes and a loss of the usual associations; for example, a separation of affect from cognition.
See: multiple personality
4. A state used as an essential part of a technique for healing in psychology and psychotherapy, for instance in hypnotherapy or the neurolinguistic programming technique of time-line therapy.
See also: Time-Line therapy
5. The translocation between a large chromosome and a small supernumerary one.
6. Separation of the nuclear components of a heterokaryotic dikaryon.

dissociation

a process in which a chemical combination breaks up into component parts, as with haemoglobin and oxygen. See OXYGEN-DISSOCIATION CURVE.

Dissociation

A psychological mechanism in which the mind splits off certain aspects of a traumatic event from conscious awareness. Dissociation can affect the patient's memory, sense of reality, and sense of identity.

dissociation

Elimination of the stimulus to fusion. It is usually accomplished by occluding one eye, or by inducing gross distortion of the image seen by one eye (e.g. Maddox rod), or by placing a strong prism in front of one eye (e.g. von Graefe's test) with the result that the eyes will move to the passive position (or heterophoria position). See dissociated heterophoria; passive position; diplopia test; dissociating test.

dis·so·ci·a·tion

, disassociation (di-sōsē-āshŭn, disă-)
An unconscious separation of a group of mental processes from the rest, resulting in an independent functioning of these processes and a loss of usual associations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, this book succeeds in showing that the process of disassociation of the Polri from the military structure has advanced the prospects of independence and professionalism although there are many serious problems that should be improved.
Nawaf Salam, was the one who came up with the policy of disassociation. On 3 August of last year, he insisted that Lebanon disassociate itself from the vote on the Security Council statement that condemned "wide-scale human rights violations committed by the Syrian authorities against civilians." This permitted the issuing of the declaration at the time, because it would not have passed had Lebanon voted no.
While some colleges are on course with their timetable work as teachers have decided to not respond to Delhi University Teachers' Association ( DUTA)' s call for disassociation, heads of other institutions are hopeful of a resolution in the wake of a circular sent out by the university.
There has been some speculation that the disassociation was a hasty decision made as a result of a disagreement between individual members of Region 3 and the national body.
Inner bearing ranges of motion were determined and the components then mechanically tested to determine inner bearing pull-out disassociation strengths as well as static and dynamic impingement forces for disassociation.
The Task Group developing IEEE 802.11w is focused on improving the security of the 802.11 management frames, including but not limited to action management frames and deauthentification and disassociation frames.
"We have gone from 12% to over 20% and that kind of increase is only because of the rising disassociation with Labour.
Jackson refused to comment on any problems with his legal team - but later, his camp filed an official notice of disassociation.
SHEC-Labs, founded in 1996, has developed technologies to more economically harness the power of the sun, reduce the temperatures required for the disassociation of water and more economically produce hydrogen from fossil fuels.
They were also asked to sign a "statement of repudiation and disassociation from the actions of the General Synod" on the matter of same-sex relationships.
The tension patterns also bring about emotional distress and mental anguish such as anxiety, depression, disassociation, hopelessness, and resignation.
Supplementing the IPSec-secured wireless capabilities of the SOHO TZW, SonicOS 2.0 now provides further security features, such as detecting and protecting against rogue access points, disassociation attacks, and association flood attacks.