disable

(redirected from disabling)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

disable

(dĭs-ā′bəl)
tr.v. disa·bled, disa·bling, disa·bles
To deprive of capability or effectiveness, especially to impair the physical abilities of.

dis·a′ble·ment n.
dis·a′bling adj.
dis·a′bling·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, the more visible the disability, the more likely an individual's disabling problems are to be recognized by an employer and subject to negative prejudgment.
Among the factors that most often cause a person's worklife to be prematurely shortened are degenerative changes and complications associated with a disabling problem.
Her work career ended at age 43 after she was formally diagnosed with reflex sympathetic dystrophy, a progressively disabling problem that can cause intense pain and loss of function.
The camps are staffed by teams of trained professionals who provide services to children with disabling conditions who live in rural communities.
The replacement of "spastic" with "cerebral palsy" suggests an increased sensitivity of the Society to the disabling condition.
That is, they began because of the absence or inadequacy of educational and rehabilitation services, and were initiated by the private sector, often by a wealthy family member of a child with the disabling condition.
Tertiary prevention is the reduction of the potential adverse consequences of a disabling condition.
(6) Toubbeh JI, Handicapping and disabling conditions in Native American populations, American Rehabilitation, 11(1), January-March, 1985.
The diagnosis of a disabling condition in a child may have a traumatic effect on the entire family and may predispose both child and family to concomitant problems of adjustment.
While disabling conditions appearing in young adults may be aggressively diagnosed and treated, the same conditions occurring in elderly persons may be attributed to the aging process alone, and not adequately diagnosed or treated (Becker & Kaufman, 1988; Carlson, 1988).
The purpose of this research was to achieve a feasibility study by investigating the relationship between closure status (successfully rehabilitated-status 26 and unsuccessfully rehabilitated-statuses 28 and 30) and disability beneficiary status (Supplemental Security Income-SSI, Social Security Disability Insurance-SSDI, and SSI/SSDI) on each of five intake variables (age, highest grade completed, marital status, major disabling condition, and monthly family income) and separately on each of the three process variables (cost of case services, number of services received, and number of months on agency rolls).
The RSA 300 Information Form including Case Service Codes and the Statistical Reporting System Classification of Disabling Conditions were utilized in the investigation (Rehabilitation Services Administration RSA 1974).