disabled infant

disabled infant

A child of less than one year of age with a physical or mental impairment that may substantially limit one or more major life function, such as breathing, seeing, hearing, walking, caring for oneself, performing manual tasks, learning and working.
References in periodicals archive ?
A chimpanzee mother cared for her disabled infant in the wild in Tanzania, Japanese researchers reported in a study published this week, research they hope will help in understanding the evolution of social care in humans.
The policy provides liability insurance to cover the cost of a lawsuit and payment for an adverse outcome or a system to assist a disabled infant and its family.
As a single mother with a disabled infant, Jai no longer felt able to work, and she and the kids went on W-2.
I spent a few years as a roughneck in the oil patch, parented a nephew or two, experienced the short life of my developmentally disabled infant son and faced outcomes from my own behavior.
Many of the needs of the disabled infant are similar to those of any infant, but he or she may need additional tactile, visual, and auditory stimulation.
Now notice what the commentators on the case study have to say about (what else?) a disabled infant. Baby Grace faces a life in which she will be cognitively normal, but quadriplegic and ventilator dependent.
Obviously, if you kill somebody whose preferences don't have much chance of success--a severely disabled infant, for example, or somebody in an advanced stage of Alzheimer's disease--the moral equation becomes entirely different." Or "killing a disabled infant is not morally equivalent to killing a person.
One minute is all that is needed to understand why the protesters were so angry: "Killing a disabled infant," Singer writes, "is not morally equivalent to killing a person.
It has a real-life effect--especially when it comes to sick and disabled infants.
A former Limpopo physiotherapist-turned Professor in Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Oklahoma has coinvented a mobile device that 'teaches' disabled infants how to crawl, miraculously transforming their cognition, early mobility and life prospects.
These concerns include questions over the possibility of delivering disabled infants, experiencing difficulty in delivery, or passing the illness on genetically.
Their critique of the disability literature highlighted its tendency to 'either emphasize the social at the risk of emptying out the subjectivity of mothers and their disabled infants, or emphasize the relational and individual capacities of caregiver-infant relationships, at the risk of ignoring the broader social context which provides the conditions for this relationship'.

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