dirty bomb

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dirty bomb

an explosive device that disperses radioactive material over a wide area, contaminating land, buildings, and people. Its purpose is to cause fear and to make an area unusable for a long time.
A conventional bomb—i.e., explosive delivery device—which would contain high-level radioactive waste or subnuclear weapons-grade material and theoretically contaminate a wide area with radioactivity

dir·ty bomb

(dĭr'tē bom)
A mass-casualty weapon that combines some sort of radioactive material with conventional explosives.

dirty bomb

A weapon that disperses into the environment low-level radioactive material bonded to a conventional explosive.
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The auditors' aim this time around was to see whether the government had cleaned up its act and taken steps to close some simple gateways to obtaining the ingredients for a dirty bomb.
IS(IL) has confirmed that we have acquired a dirty bomb from radioactive material from Mosul Uni
Another suspected IS fighter claimed independently: "IS has confirmed that we have acquired a dirty bomb from radioactive material from Mosul Uni
government institute policies that curb the use of cesium chloride, which is also found in medical and other research equipment and can be used to make dirty bombs.
Suppose it was created by terrorists wielding a dirty bomb, an explosive laced with a radioactive substance such as uranium or cesium?
Mr Bradley said: "This is the most realistic programme that has ever been done about the aftermath of a dirty bomb.
Airline insurance contracts are up for renewal in the second half of 2004 and insurers have made clear they no longer want to cover the risk of terrorist attack by a plane carrying a dirty bomb - something which could result in billions of Dollars worth of damage.
Dirty bombs are small amounts of radioactive material wrapped inside conventional explosives.
The LAPD has recently procured -- using some of the $3 million in funding from the Department of Homeland Security -- devices capable of detecting so-called dirty bombs, or radiological dispersion devices.
Policymakers and the public need to understand the costs and risks associated with dirty bombs to invest appropriate resources for preparation and prevention efforts as well as for consequence mitigation," he said.
Dirty bombs can create large radioactive plumes, cause health and psychological effects, and produce significant economic impacts largely due to decontamination efforts.
The immediate concerns raised by both agencies are if the loss or theft of highly enriched uranium, plutonium or different types of radioactive sources fall into the hands of terrorist groups who then go onto create crude nuclear devices or dirty bombs.