dirty bomb


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A conventional bomb—i.e., explosive delivery device—which would contain high-level radioactive waste or subnuclear weapons-grade material and theoretically contaminate a wide area with radioactivity

dir·ty bomb

(dĭr'tē bom)
A mass-casualty weapon that combines some sort of radioactive material with conventional explosives.

dirty bomb

A weapon that disperses into the environment low-level radioactive material bonded to a conventional explosive.
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The NRC promised "immediate action to address the weaknesses we identified," according to the GAO's report on that incident.The auditors' aim this time around was to see whether the government had cleaned up its act and taken steps to close some simple gateways to obtaining the ingredients for a dirty bomb.
DESTRUCTIVE Tariq, 37, who has had his passport cancelled by the Home Office, told fellow militants via a social media account that jihadist dirty bombs are now a reality.
Tariq, 37, of Dudley, West Mids, wrote online: "O by the way Islamic State does have a Dirty bomb. We found some Radio active material from Mosul university."
In a so-called "dirty bomb", conventional explosives are used to disperse radiation from any radioactive source, such as from hospitals and factories which are less well protected.
Dirty Bomb Shell offers helpful advice for singers facing surgery or other medical procedures: ask questions, understand the impact of the treatment, and make sure all medical personnel involved in your care--from anesthesiologists to nurses--know you are a singer.
A so-called dirty bomb can combine conventional explosives such as dynamite with radioactive material.
Radioactive material may be dispersed indoors to contaminate a building, though the scenario most commonly discussed involves detonation of a dirty bomb outdoors.
First of all, if anybody ever doubted the power of a dirty bomb to devastate a nation, both physically and psychologically, their doubts would most probably have been dispelled by events in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 rather than current radiation leaks from nuclear power plants.
A reminder of far more sinister potential consequences if terrorists ever managed to set off a dirty bomb in a British city, as outlined in a Ministry of Defence memo last month (remember the Raymond Briggs animation When The Wind Blows?).
In 1996, Muslim fighters from the breakaway province of Chechnya planted, but did not detonate, a dirty bomb in Moscow's Izmailovo park.
For example, Washington counterterrorism consultant Steven Emerson told CNBC in 2002 that a dirty bomb that killed no one at all would trigger "absolutely enormous" panic, deal "a devastating blow to the economy," and "supersede even the 9/11 attacks." Training scenarios such as the U.S.
A dirty bomb is a weapon that uses explosives to create a cloud of radioactive materials.