CTP

(redirected from direct-to-plate)
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CTP

Abbreviation for cytidine 5'-triphosphate.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

CTP

Abbreviation for:
California Test of Personality
carboxy-terminal peptide
citalopram
citrate transport protein
Community Third Party (Medspeak-UK)
comprehensive treatment plan
conditioned taste preference
CT perfusion
C-terminal peptide
cytidine triphosphate
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

CTP

Abbreviation for cytidine 5'-triphosphate.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Occasionally referred to as direct-to-plate, CTP is not brand new; future-minded companies set themselves up as guinea pigs several years ago when print vendors first started experimenting with the process.
in South Bend saw the latest direct-to-plate equipment at a recent convention.
His management career was preceded by field sales positions at Compugraphic and Agfa, where he helped introduce direct-to-plate and PostScript imaging to Chicago-based printers.
When you combine the direct-to-plate with the quality that the Gallus presses have, the skill level of our operators and our constant focus on continuous improvement, we have been able to produce some great quality.
Kaminsky: Most important will be digital photography, with the capability of producing high-quality fashion shots on location anywhere in the world, in addition to a digital production workflow with the ability to use the same digital data to drive both direct-to-cylinder engraving and direct-to-plate imaging.
and Hoechst AG developed the LE55 direct-to-plate laser imager.
Unlike thermal ablative mask imaging methods, this direct-to-plate method requires just a simple water wash and dry processing after imaging.
So does direct-to-plate technology offer all the benefits that printers are promising?
The paper recently installed a direct-to-plate system, and upgraded its advertising system following the acquisition of Mid York Weekly and shoppers.
Dan Rosen, of BASF Printing Systems, explained direct-to-plate technologies through the use of industry case studies.
Each of these larger printers can receive a creative file with scans, show proofs, produce film, prepare plates, provide direct-to-plate capability, print, bind, address, sort files for postal discounts and drop ship the mail.
It was fully paginated long before most papers of its size, and now it is ready to move to direct-to-plate. Or, as O'Brien might say, direct-to-plate is ready for the newspaper.