direct thrombin inhibitors

direct thrombin inhibitors

A new class of anticoagulant drugs that bind directly to thrombin and prevent its interaction with its substrates. They include HIRUDIN, argatroban, bivalirudin and desirudin.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is prolonged by heparin, direct thrombin inhibitors, a deficiency of or inhibitor of factors in the intrinsic and common pathways (e.
In patients with HIT, heparin should be avoided to prevent recurrent HIT and PCI should be performed using alternative anticoagulants including direct thrombin inhibitors without cross-reactivity with HIT antibodies, such as argatroban, bivalirudin, and hirudin.
4) However, there is no defined aPTT therapeutic range for dabigatran, (4,16) and the aPTT assay is relatively insensitive to different plasma concentrations of some direct thrombin inhibitors.
Future development of this technology holds the promise of providing methods to refine understanding of the interaction between cellular and plasma components in blood, the rapid and sensitive identification of patients at risk for clotting or bleeding, and the ascertainment of relevant endpoints for therapeutic monitoring, such as patients on direct thrombin inhibitors, with a single, simple-to-employ analytic approach that maybe suitable for routine use in both research and diverse clinical settings.
3) Direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) act by directly inhibiting thrombin to delay clotting.
Direct thrombin inhibitors (DTIs) are a class of anticoagulants that act by directly inhibiting thrombin to delay clotting and are typically used during HIT and in acute coronary syndrome (see Table 1).
The use of direct thrombin inhibitors (DTI) such as Lepirudin or Argatroban is becoming more widely accepted as means of anticoagulating HIT and other hypercoagulable patients.
A group of cardiologists and cardiovascular medicine specialists from the US, Europe, and Canada discuss therapies individually and in combination, including fibrinolytic agents; antiplatelet therapies like aspirin, thieneopyridines, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors; anticoagulant therapies such as unfractionated heparin, low-molecular-weight heparins, direct thrombin inhibitors, and synthetic factor X inhibitors; and therapies for non-ST-segment elevation ACS and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.
Direct thrombin inhibitors inhibit the clotting cascade by binding to and blocking thrombin.