direct life cycle

direct life cycle

A parasite life cycle in which the parasite is transmitted directly from host to host without an intermediate (i.e., other species) host or vector.
References in periodicals archive ?
Poinar (1987) did not rule out that some spider mermithid species may also have a direct life cycle.
For example, winged, flying insects are more likely to be consumed by web spinning or foliage/flower hunting spiders than they are by non-web spinning, ground hunters or burrowing, sit and wait predators, which can be expected to feed primarily on non-flying, mainly fully terrestrial prey and are thus, more likely to be hosts to mermithids with a direct life cycle.
The large number of non-web spinning, cursorial Lycosidae (Table 1; 38% of all species, excluding nomina dubia) with undescribed mermithids, suggests that a direct life cycle may be involved in some instances.
Capillaria species have direct life cycles and can spread from one fish to another by ingestion of infective larvae.
Even though Capillaria species have direct life cycles a tubifex worm may act as a paratenic (alternative) host and "carry" infective stages of Capillaria to the fish that consumed them.
Direct life cycles involve only one definitive host, whereas indirect life cycles involve a definitive host and one or more intermediate hosts.
Direct life cycles involve a single host where the parasite often spends most of its life (usually as an adult) and where it reproduces.