direct laryngoscopy


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia.

di·rect lar·yn·gos·co·py

inspection of the larynx by means of either a hollow instrument or a fiberoptic cable.

direct laryngoscopy

Etymology: L, diregere, to direct, Gk, larynx + skopein, to watch
an examination of the larynx by means of a lighted instrument inserted through the mouth.

di·rect lar·yn·gos·co·py

(dĭr-ekt' lar'in-gos'kŏ-pē)
Inspection of the larynx by means of either a rigid, hollow instrument or a fiberoptic cable.

direct laryngoscopy

Laryngoscopy with a laryngeal speculum or laryngoscope.
See also: laryngoscopy
References in periodicals archive ?
Video Laryngoscopy vs Direct Laryngoscopy on Successful First-Pass Orotracheal Intubation Among ICU Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial.
Success of intubation rescue techniques after failed direct laryngoscopy in adults: A retrospective comparative analysis from the multicenter perioperative outcomes group.
Overzealous use of deep anaesthesia, local anaesthetics, depressant drugs or vasodilators in an attempt to prevent circulatory changes caused by direct laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation may ultimately introduce more hazard than the response they were intended to attenuate.
compared five video laryngoscopes and conventional direct laryngoscopy on simple and simulated difficult airways on the intubation trainer.
Videolaryngoscopes with standard Macintosh blades are inserted using the same technique as in direct laryngoscopy.
Tracheal intubation attempts lasting more than ten minutes with direct laryngoscopy.
Direct laryngoscopy This technique allows doctors to inspect the larynx in greater detail and to use a device called an operating microscope.
KEY WORDS: Direct Laryngoscopy, Microlaryngoscopy, Hoarseness.
In 1913, Chevalier Jackson reported a high rate of success for the use of direct laryngoscopy as a means to intubate the trachea.
The patient was intubated in the theatre and direct laryngoscopy demonstrated an oedematous supraglottis with redundant patchy necrosis occluding the glottis.
Visualization of the glottic area via direct laryngoscopy is highly hazardous; therefore, this course of action should only be performed as part of the intubation procedure.
All subjects were first evaluated with manometry and a direct laryngoscopy to exclude other causes and to define the severity and extension of laryngitis.