direct Coombs test


Also found in: Acronyms.

di·rect Coombs test

(kūmz), Avoid the incorrect forms Coomb and Coomb's.
a test for detecting sensitized erythrocytes in erythroblastosis fetalis and in cases of acquired immune hemolytic anemia: the patient's erythrocytes are washed with saline to remove serum and unattached antibody protein, then incubated with Coombs anti-human globulin (usually serum from a rabbit or goat previously immunized with human globulin); after incubation, the system is centrifuged and examined for agglutination, which indicates the presence of so-called incomplete or univalent antibodies on the surface of the erythrocytes.

direct Coombs test

See Antiglobulin test.

di·rect Coombs test

(dĭr-ekt kūmz test)
Assessment to detect sensitized erythrocytes in erythroblastosis fetalis and in cases of acquired immune hemolytic anemia.

Coombs,

Robin R.A., English veterinarian and immunologist, 1921–.
Coombs serum - serum from a rabbit or other animal previously immunized with purified human globulin to prepare antibodies directed against IgG and complement. Synonym(s): antihuman globulin
Coombs test - a test for antibodies, the so-called antihuman globulin test, using either the direct or indirect Coombs tests. Synonym(s): antiglobulin test
direct Coombs test - a test for detecting sensitized erythrocytes in erythroblastosis fetalis and in cases of acquired immune hemolytic anemia.
Gell and Coombs reaction - see under Gell
indirect Coombs test - a test routinely performed in cross-matching blood or in the investigation of transfusion reaction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Infants at high risk of severe hyperbilirubinemia are those with jaundice in the first 24 hours, predischarge bilirubin levels in the high-risk zone, blood group incompatibility by positive DAT (direct antiglobulin test or the direct Coombs test) or hemolytic disease, gestational age between 35 to 36 weeks, a previous sibling with phototherapy treatment, and cephalohematoma.
The pro-thrombin time was 11.8sec, and indirect and direct Coombs test was negative.
The patient is still being followed up by us and the hemoglobin, reticulocyte, and bilirubin levels have been found to be normal, the direct Coombs test became negative and has not become positive again.
[2] concluded that 'post-phototherapy neonatal bilirubin rebound to clinically significant levels may occur, especially in cases of prematurity, direct Coombs test positivity, and those treated [greater than or equal to] 72 hours'.
Moreover, results of a direct Coombs test were negative, although a routine peripheral blood smear revealed the presence of "bite cells." An enzymopathy with a drug-induced acute episode of hemolytic anemia was suspected.
Laboratory findings were as follows: total bilirubin: 17.6 mg/dL, direct bilirubin: 0.5 mg/dL, hemoglobin: 15.7 g/dL, white blood cells (WBC): 7730 /[mm.sup.3], platelet count: 274,000 /[mm.sup.3], blood group: 0 Rh (+), reticulocyte count: 1.56%, and direct Coombs test: (++++).
Arthralgias, lymphopenia, raised globulins and markedly raised ESR brought our mind towards some autoimmune process, but antinuclear antibody (ANA) and direct Coombs test were negative.
The presented patient's negative direct Coombs test indicated that erythroid suppression, rather than hemolysis was the predominant mechanism responsible for fetal anemia secondary to maternal Kell alloimmunization.
(This would pertain providing the intended recipient has a negative atypical antibody screen and direct Coombs test and a negative transfusion reaction history.)
Antiplatelet and anti-neutrophil antibodies, together with anti-erythrocyte antibodies detected with a positive direct Coombs test are the most common autoantibodies found in ALPS (23, 24).
The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level was elevated to 1014U/L and direct coombs test (DAT) was repeated and again negative.