diplopia


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diplopia

 [dĭ-plo´pe-ah]
the perception of two images of a single object; called also double vision.
binocular diplopia double vision in which the images of an object are formed on noncorresponding points of the retinas.
crossed diplopia horizontal diplopia in which the image belonging to the right eye is displaced to the left of the image belonging to the left eye (divergent strabismus).
direct diplopia horizontal diplopia in which the image belonging to the right eye appears to the right of the image belonging to the left eye (convergent strabismus).
horizontal diplopia diplopia in which the two images lie in the same horizontal plane, being either direct or crossed.
vertical diplopia diplopia in which one image appears above the other in the same vertical plane.

di·plo·pi·a

(di-plō'pē-ă),
The condition in which a single object is perceived as two objects.
Synonym(s): double vision
[diplo- + G. ōps, eye]

diplopia

(dĭ-plō′pē-ə)
di·plo′pic (-plō′pĭk, dĭ-plŏp′ĭk) adj.

diplopia

Double vision Ophthalmology A condition whereby a single object appears as 2

di·plo·pi·a

(dip-lō'pē-ă)
The condition in which a single object is perceived as two objects.
Synonym(s): double vision.
[G. diplous, double + G. ōps, eye]

diplopia

Double vision. The perception of two images of a single object. This occurs in squint (strabismus) when both eyes are not aligned on the object of interest. Diplopia with one eye is rare but possible.

Diplopia

The medical term for seeing double.
Mentioned in: Nasal Trauma

diplopia

The condition in which a single object is seen as two rather than one. This is usually due to images not stimulating corresponding retinal areas. Other causes are given below. Syn. double vision (colloquial). See differential prismatic effect; haplopia; myasthenia gravis; retinal corresponding points; polyopia; multiple sclerosis; strabismus; diplopia test; triplopia.
binocular diplopia Diplopia in which one image is seen by one eye and the other image is seen by the other eye.
crossed diplopia See heteronymous diplopia.
heteronymous diplopia Binocular diplopia in which the image received by the right eye appears to the left and that received by the left eye appears to the right. In this condition the images are formed on the temporal retina. Syn. crossed diplopia.
homonymous diplopia Binocular diplopia in which the image received by the right eye appears to the right and that received by the left eye appears to the left. In this condition, the images are formed on the nasal retina. Syn. uncrossed diplopia.
incongruous diplopia Diplopia present in individuals with abnormal retinal correspondence in which the relative positions of the two images differ from what would be expected on the basis of normal retinal correspondence. Example: an exotrope experiencing homonymous diplopia instead of heteronymous diplopia. Syn. paradoxical diplopia. See abnormal retinal correspondence.
monocular diplopia Diplopia seen by one eye only. It is usually caused by irregular refraction in one eye (e.g. in early cataracts, corneal opacity) or by dicoria or polycoria. It may be induced by placing a biprism in front of one eye. See ghost image; luxation of the lens.
paradoxical diplopia See incongruous diplopia.
pathological diplopia Any diplopia due to an eye disease (e.g. proptosis), an anomaly of binocular vision (e.g. strabismus), a variation in the refractive index of the media of the eye (e.g. cataract), a subluxation of the crystalline lens, or to a general disease (e.g. multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis). See exophthalmos; luxation of the lens.
physiological diplopia Normal phenomenon which occurs in binocular vision for non-fixated objects whose images fall on disparate retinal points. It is easily demonstrated to persons with normal binocular vision: fixate binocularly a distant object and place a pencil vertically some 25 cm in front of your nose. You should see two rather blurred pencils. The observation of physiological diplopia has been found to be useful in the management of eso or exo deviations, suppression, abnormal retinal correspondence, etc. (Fig. D4). See Brock string; retinal disparity.
diplopia test See diplopia test.
uncrossed diplopia See homonymous diplopia.
Fig. D4 Physiological diplopia. The subject fixates a distant object Aenlarge picture
Fig. D4 Physiological diplopia. The subject fixates a distant object A

di·plo·pi·a

(dip-lō'pē-ă)
The condition in which a single object is perceived as two objects.
Synonym(s): double vision.
[G. diplous, double + G. ōps, eye]

Patient discussion about diplopia

Q. what is the cause for double vision

A. Double vision, or diplopia, as it's called, may be due to many conditions, including disorders of the muscles of the eye (extra-ocular muscles) and the nerves controlling them, disorders of the eye ball (enlarged eyeball as in Graves' ), and sometimes disorders of vision.

Diplopia may manifest important conditions, so consulting a doctor (e.g. neurologist or ophthalmologist) may be wise.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003029.htm

More discussions about diplopia
References in periodicals archive ?
- Esodesviacion talamica consistente en una diplopia binocular horizontal, donde se observa una Esodesviacion concomitante (3).
In conclusion, although orbital myositis is a rare entity in childhood, it should be considered in patients presenting with complaints of diplopia, proptosis, periorbital edema and anomalous head posture in differential diagnosis.
The Phase 3 confirmatory trial and extension studies will evaluate diplopia in people with moderate-to-severe active TED.
All of the patients had torsional and vertical diplopia. The etiology in all cases was closed head trauma due to vehicular accident.
Our case shows that special care should be taken while examining patients with a long history of low vision because the most common symptoms of orbital tumors, such as diplopia, loss of vision, and proptosis, may remain unnoticed by these patients in the absence of a specific evaluation.
"Overall, poor HRQOL in patients with glaucoma is moderately associated with worse diplopia, lower mean deviation on visual field testing in either eye, poorer visual acuity in either eye, treatment type, and younger age," the authors write.
No significant correlation was observed between choroidal thickness and habit of smoking, diplopia, or severity grading of GO.
At one month after trauma, the patient's eye movements remained intact, and there were no diplopia and apparent enophthalmos.
A 69-year-old male with past medical history of type 2 diabetes and hypertension presented to the emergency department in New York City in August complaining of headache and diplopia. His headache abruptly began one week ago, was localized to the right occipital region, and gradually moved to his right orbit.
There are few guidelines that exist on how to proceed if an orbital floor injury is noticed during ESS, and subsequent management may affect long-term outcomes such as persistent diplopia. In this report of a case, we (1) describe a patient who suffered orbital floor injury and isolated inferior rectus muscle damage from ESS, (2) endoscopically demonstrate the proximity of the orbital floor to the maxillary antrostomy site, and (3) discuss management of the floor and the adjacent sinuses if orbital floor injury is noticed intraoperatively.
La paciente consulto por un cuadro de proptosis axial progresiva izquierda de un ano de evolucion asociada a dolor ocular sin cambios en la agudeza visual, sin limitacion en los movimientos oculares ni diplopia.
During his first visit to our center, he complained of diplopia, visual decrease (from vision of oculus sinister [VS] 1.0–0.2 to vision of oculus dexter [VD] 1.0–0.8).