diploidy


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Related to diploidy: haploidy, polyploidy

diploidy

 [dip´loi-de]
the state of being diploid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

diploidy

(dĭp′loi′dē)
n.
The state or condition of being diploid.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

diploidy

A DNA complement double the haploid number, n–ie, 2n. See Haploid. Cf Aneuploidy.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

di·ploi·dy

(dip'loy-dē)
Denotes having two sets of homologous chromosomes.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
These share morphology and lack of p57 expression with typical androgenetic CHMs, but the DNA genotyping result of biparental diploidy could be misinterpreted as a nonmolar conception in the absence of correlation with morphologic features and p57 results.
These results suggest that female triploid Yesso scallops can release mature and functional gametes, and aneuploid progeny closest to euploidy, especially diploidy, survive longer.
Evidence for diploidy at the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase locus.
Multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of aneuploidy and diploidy frequencies in 225,846 sperm from 10 normal men.
Egg maturation and parthenogenetic recovery of diploidy in the scorpion Liocheles australasiae (Fabricius) (Scorpions, Ischnuridae).
The original breeding objectives and recombination patterns of the parental genomes dictated that this work be started at the tetraploid level but the requirements of turfgrass breeding demand diploidy. In a single experiment, a large number of diploids were obtained from the selected best tetraploid clones available.
Polyploid oysters can lose chromosomes de novo and can even revert from triploidy to diploidy or from tetraploidy to triploidy (Allen et al., 1997).
However, recent data show that a small percentage of triploid individuals progressively revert toward diploidy, introducing the possibility that Suminoe oysters might establish self-sustaining populations.
These associations usually publish quarterly bulletins dispensing practical, and sometimes scientific data which covers a range of topics from gardening tips, memories of travelling and botanising trips, hybridising techniques and the inherent diploidy and triploidy factors, seed germination and a variety of humorous personal trivia.
People, parrots, perch, polyps, and all the animals ia between usually inherit one copy of a set of chromosomes from each of their parents, a system called diploidy.
Since (assuming a 1:1 primary sex ratio) the production of females is associated with production of an equal number of males, the fitness benefit from each brood doubles, thus canceling the diploidy scaling.
Most multicellular organisms have diploidy, and it is thought that this maintains population diversity and improves the survival of species in a fluctuating environment.