genome

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genome

 [je´nōm]
the complete set of genes, hereditary factors contained in the haploid set of chromosomes; the human genome has an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 genes. adj., adj genom´ic.

ge·nome

(je'nōm, -nom),
1. A complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent, the haploid number of a gamete.
See also: Human Genome Project.
2. The total gene complement of a set of chromosomes found in higher life forms (the haploid set in a eukaryotic cell), or the functionally similar but simpler linear arrangements found in bacteria and viruses.
See also: Human Genome Project.
[gene + -ome, suffix denoting a defined system or microcosm, fr. G. -ōma, noun suffix]

genome

(jē′nōm′)
n.
1. The total genetic content contained in a haploid set of chromosomes in eukaryotes, in a single chromosome in bacteria or archaea, or in the DNA or RNA of viruses.
2. An organism's genetic material.

ge·no′mic (-nō′mĭk) adj.

genome

Genetic structure Genetics All the genetic information in an organism's chromosomes and mitochondria; its size is given in base pairs. See Base pair, Chromosome, Mitochondrial genome, Nuclear genome.

ge·nome

(jē'nōm)
1. A complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent, the haploid number of a gamete.
2. The total gene complement of a set of chromosomes found in higher life forms (the haploid set in a eukaryotic cell), or the functionally similar but simpler linear arrangements found in bacteria and viruses.
See also: Human Genome Project
[G. genos, birth + (chromos) ome]

genome

The complete set of CHROMOSOMES, together with the MITOCHONDRIAL DNA, containing the entire genetic material of the cell.

genome

the complete complement of genetic material in a cell, or carried by an individual.

Genome

The genetic makeup of a cell, composed of DNA.
Mentioned in: Malignant Melanoma

genome

The complete set of genes in an individual. In humans it is estimated at approximately 30 000 genes and over three billion base pairs (two nucleotides joined together across a double helix) of DNA.

ge·nome

(jē'nōm)
Complete set of chromosomes derived from one parent; haploid number of a gamete.
References in periodicals archive ?
During the processes of syngamy and cleavage, the newly formed diploid genome is not functioning because the zygote is not yet activated.
The phylogeny that was used includes grass species with diploid genomes of known DNA content and integrates results from a recent and comprehensive phylogenetic study based on macromorphology, anatomy, biochemistry, and the sequence of chloroplast and nuclear genes (Grass Phylogeny Working Group, 2001] with inferences from RNA structure and large-scale chromosomal rearrangements (Caetano-Anolles, 2005).
A population of diploid genomes is simulated on the computer using Monte-Carlo simulations by keeping track of all loci, their effect, and there place in the genome, for each genome.
However, the scarce available evidence for bivalves based only on 14 marine species shows low quantity of constitutive heterochromatin within the diploid genomes examined (Martinez et al.
Because modern wheat is an allohexaploid (2n = 42) consisting of three diploid genomes: A, B, and D (Poehlman and Sleper, 1995) and ALS in wheat is produced by a multigene family, the enzyme produced by the A and B genome homoeologues remains susceptible to imidazolinone herbicides (Pozniak et al., 2004a).
The E(NK) model: Extending the NK model to incorporate gene-by-environment interactions and epistasis for diploid genomes. Complexity 7:31-47.
A most important consequence of sexual reproduction is the generation of novel diploid genomes through syngamy of two haploid, meiotically recombined gametes.
Webster (Naumova et al., 1999) also suggest the presence of apomixis gene(s) in diploid genomes. These findings indicate potential to clone the apomixis gene(s) from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) libraries of the relatively small genomes in these species.