diploblastic


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

diploblastic

 [dip″lo-blas´tik]
having two germ layers.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dip·lo·blas·tic

(dip'lō-blas'tik),
Formed of two germ layers.
[diplo- + G. blastos, germ]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

diploblastic

(dĭp′lō-blăs′tĭk)
adj.
Having body tissues derived from only two germ layers, the endoderm and the ectoderm, as in the cnidarians.

dip′lo·blas′ty n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dip·lo·blas·tic

(dip'lō-blas'tik)
Formed of two germ layers.
[diplo- + G. blastos, germ]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

diploblastic

Formed from two of the germ layers of the embryo.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

diploblastic

(of animals) having a body wall of two layers of cells, the ECTODERM and ENDODERM, an arrangement found in, for example, the COELENTERATES.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence or absence of true musculature has traditionally established the level of organismal complexity that distinguishes animals as either diploblastic or triploblastic (Burton.
Investigating the origins of triploblasty: "'mesodermal" gene expression in a diploblastic animal, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis (phylum, Cnidaria: class, Anthozoa).
Genomes of diploblastic organisms contain homeoboxes: sequence of eveC, an even-skipped homologue from the cnidarian Acropora formosa.
Its diploblastic body plan is therefore simple, as is its embryogenesis.
The evolutionary distance is considerable between the diploblastic, radially symmetrical cnidaria and the triploblastic bilateral phyla of both deuterostomes and protostomes.
As in phylogenetic trees previously constructed on the basis of rDNA sequences (Christen et al., 1991; Wainright et al., 1993; Smother et al., 1994), Trichoplax, which had once tentatively been grouped in the phylum Mesozoa (see Brusca and Brusca, 1990), was positioned within the diploblastic assemblage.