diphtheroid

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diphtheroid

 [dif´thĕ-roid]
1. resembling diphtheria or the diphtheria bacillus.

diph·the·roid

(dif'thĕ-royd),
1. One of a group of local infections suggesting diphtheria, but caused by microorganisms other than Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Synonym(s): Epstein disease, false diphtheria, pseudodiphtheria
2. Any microorganism resembling Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
[diphtheria + G. eidos, resemblance]

diph·the·roid

(dif'thĕ-royd)
1. One of a group of local infections suggesting diphtheria, but caused by microorganisms other than Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
Synonym(s): pseudodiphtheria.
2. Any microorganism resembling Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
[diphtheria + G. eidos, resemblance]

Epstein,

Alois, Czech pediatrician working in Austria, 1849-1918.
Epstein disease - one of a group of local infections suggesting diphtheria, but caused by microorganisms other than Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Synonym(s): diphtheroid
Epstein pearls - multiple small white epithelial inclusion cysts found in the midline of the palate in newborn infants.
Epstein sign - lid retraction in an infant, giving it a frightened expression and a wild glance.
Epstein symptom

diph·the·roid

(dif'thĕ-royd)
One of a group of local infections suggesting diphtheria, but caused by microorganisms other than Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
Synonym(s): Epstein disease.
[diphtheria + G. eidos, resemblance]
References in periodicals archive ?
The patients included in the study were of presumptive Microbial Keratitis, 173 cases of bacterial cases 68 (39.30%) positively correlated with gram stain findings, from these 68 cases 25 (36.76%) grew organisms on culture which included 20 (80%) isolates Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 2 (8%) isolates each of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species and 1 (4%) isolate of Diphtheroids species.
The most common organisms isolated after the third day of incubation were Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylocci, and diphtheroids. These organisms constituted 71.6 percent of the fourth and fifth day isolates.
Enterobacter (2.55%); the least common were the gram-positive Diphtheroids, Enterococci and Pneumococci (Table-I).
Difficulties in differentiating a rapidly growing Mycobacterium species from diphtheroids in an immunocompromised patient.
The Corynebacteria are divided into two groups: Corynebacterium diphtheriae and nondiphtherial Corynebacteria, collectively referred to as diphtheroids. When isolated from clinical specimens, nondiphtherial Corynebacteria, such as Corynebacterium striatum, Corynebacterium amycolatum, Corynebacterium minutissimum, Corynebacterium xerosis, and Corynebacterium freneyi, were originally thought to be contaminants [2], as these strains are commonly considered as part of the normal flora of human skin and mucous membranes.
Staphylococcus epidermidis and diphtheroids accounted for 14.8% and 11.1% of contaminants respectively.
Isolates can be mistaken for "diphtheroids" unless acid-fast staining or further identification is performed.
When quantitative cultures were performed, growth varied from less than 1 CFU/mL to fewer than 10 CFU/mL, with most producing fewer than 5 CFU/mL.[12-15] Organisms recovered were predominantly coagulase-negative staphylococci and diphtheroids, but rarely a Streptococcus viridans, Neisseria species, Haemophilus species, Moraxella species, or gram-negative bacillus was identified.
Aerobic diphtheroids of human skin, en Corynefom Bacteria, Academy Press, London: 265-287.
Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, fungi, Micrococcus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and diphtheroids were found on these surfaces.
Skin flora, including diphtheroids, [alpha]-hemolytic streptococci, and coagulase-negative staphylococci, were the most common microorganisms found on 84 randomly tested stethoscopes from house staff, medical students, and attending physicians at Grady Memorial and Emory Crawford Long Hospitals, Atlanta.
The bacteria isolated in those studies, such as coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, alpha-hemolytic Streptococcus, Enterobacter species, Acinetobacter species, non-aeruginosa species of Pseudomonas, Bacillus species, Alcaligenes species, diphtheroids, and Escherichia vulneris, do not typically cause infections in healthy people.