diphtheroid


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diphtheroid

 [dif´thĕ-roid]
1. resembling diphtheria or the diphtheria bacillus.

diph·the·roid

(dif'thĕ-royd),
1. One of a group of local infections suggesting diphtheria, but caused by microorganisms other than Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Synonym(s): Epstein disease, false diphtheria, pseudodiphtheria
2. Any microorganism resembling Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
[diphtheria + G. eidos, resemblance]

diph·the·roid

(dif'thĕ-royd)
1. One of a group of local infections suggesting diphtheria, but caused by microorganisms other than Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
Synonym(s): pseudodiphtheria.
2. Any microorganism resembling Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
[diphtheria + G. eidos, resemblance]

Epstein,

Alois, Czech pediatrician working in Austria, 1849-1918.
Epstein disease - one of a group of local infections suggesting diphtheria, but caused by microorganisms other than Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Synonym(s): diphtheroid
Epstein pearls - multiple small white epithelial inclusion cysts found in the midline of the palate in newborn infants.
Epstein sign - lid retraction in an infant, giving it a frightened expression and a wild glance.
Epstein symptom

diph·the·roid

(dif'thĕ-royd)
One of a group of local infections suggesting diphtheria, but caused by microorganisms other than Corynebacterium diphtheriae.
Synonym(s): Epstein disease.
[diphtheria + G. eidos, resemblance]
References in periodicals archive ?
Current vaccines are the diphtheria, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis (DTaP) in early childhood, and the tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheroid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) for adolescents and adults (CDC, 2010a) (see Table 3).
There was no evidence of a pathogenic infection in the wound, as cultures yielded only 'normal skin flora', which included coagulase negative Staphylococcus and diphtheroids. Cephalexin was prescribed and the patient returned home.
Multiple urine cultures revealed staphylococci, streptococci, Escherichia coli, and diphtheroid bacillus species.
Even though it grows well on commonly used clinical laboratory media, it can be confused as a streptococcus or diphtheroid and may be missed by a novice microbiologist.
Pelicans B to E also had ulcerative diphtheroid inflammation of the colon and rectum.