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DIP


dip

(dip),
1. A downward inclination or slope.
2. A preparation for coating a surface by submersion, as for the destruction of skin parasites.
[M.E. dippen]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dip

(dĭp)
v. dipped, dipping, dips
v.tr.
1. To plunge briefly into a liquid, as in order to wet, coat, or saturate.
2. To immerse (a sheep or other animal) in a disinfectant solution.
n.
A liquid into which something is dipped, as for dyeing or disinfecting.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

dip

Drug slang
A regional slang term for crack cocaine.
 
Obstetrics
See Deceleration.
 
Pulmonology
See Morning dip.
 
Tobacco
See Dipping tobacco.

DIP

Abbreviation for:
desisopropylpropranolol
desquamative interstitial pneumonia
diffuse interstitial pneumonia
digital image processing
Digital Information Policy, see there 
diisopropyl phosphate
distal interphalangeal
drug-induced psychosis
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

DIP

1. Desquamative interstitial pneumonia, see there.
2. Distal interphalangeal–joint–anatomy.

dip

1. Deceleration–obstetrics, see there.
2. Morning dip, see there.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

DIP

Abbreviation for distal interphalangeal joints.

dip

(dip)
1. A downward inclination or slope.
2. A preparation for coating a surface by submersion, as for the destruction of skin parasites.
[M.E. dippen]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The kinematic analyses have revealed that the slopes (SN-1, SN-2 and SN-3) with dip angles (0-90[degrees]) would not impose planar, toppling or wedge failures.
Reverse fault movement and its rupture in soil are mechanically analogous to a gravity wall under passive condition, with the exception that at steeper fault dip angle (larger than 45[degrees]), its mechanism is similar to vertical uplifting in hanging wall side (Anastasopouos et al., 2008b).
Three different subduction configurations were observed: The first in the Cali A segment, with maximum depth of 290km to 300km up to a distance of 300km from the trench and a dip angle that changes of 17[degrees] to 45[degrees] to a depth of 100 km.
Comparing the different strengths of the bedrock in group A and group B, the rock strength clearly has an influence on the end bearing capacity, namely, that the ultimate end bearing capacity increases as the rock strength increases when the jointed dip angle is determined.
In this case, for each fault dip angle in different earthquake magnitudes, the soil stress on the tunnel lining reached the failure state, such that, two passive zones and two active zones occurred at tunnel perimeter, due to the increase and decrease of contact stress, respectively.
At depth, earthquakes help to define the geometry of the subducting plate, which exhibits a 10[degrees] dip angle between trench and coastline, and 28[degrees] dip angle onshore down to 120 km depth.
The first, on the high dip angle part between HK and YX of the southwestern BCF, sequences 1 and 3 have no slip.
In the following deformation analysis, we studied the dip angle of the normal vector of nodes N101, N102 and N105 in the cross section as well as the azimuth value over time.
As shown in Figures 10(a)-10(c), when the dip angle of rockmass with a single structure plane is 30[degrees], 45[degrees], and 60[degrees], the rockmass strength changes greatly with rock sample size, and the fracture stress value of the rockmass is basically stable until the rockmass size greater than 5 m x 5 m.
The relationship between the fault dip angle and its internal friction angle is obtained by finding the first derivative of [alpha] and equating to zero.
Based on the theoretical calculation scheme, a simulation scheme with distances of10, 30, 50, and 70m between the working face and fault is established when the fault dip angle is 60[degrees].
For the case of overlying soil failure due to vertical movement, as the dip angle becomes larger, a greater vertical displacement is required for the surface to rupture.