dioxin


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Related to dioxin: digoxin, furan

dioxin

 [di-ok´sin]
a highly toxic and teratogenic chlorinated hydrocarbon that is a trace contaminant in the herbicides2,4,5-T and agent orange.

di·ox·in

(dī-oks'in),
1. A ring consisting of two oxygen atoms, four CH groups, and two double bonds; the positions of the oxygen atoms are specified by prefixes, as in 1,4-dioxin.
2. Abbreviation for dibenzo[b,e][1,4]dioxin which may be visualized as an anhydride of two molecules of 1,2-benzenediol (pyrocatechol), thus forming two oxygen bridges between two benzene moieties, or as a 1,4-dioxin with a benzene ring fused to catch each of the two CH=CH groups.
3. A contaminant in the herbicide, 2,4,5-T; it is potentially toxic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic.

dioxin

/di·ox·in/ (-ok´sin) any of the heterocyclic hydrocarbons present as trace contaminants in herbicides; many are oncogenic and teratogenic.

dioxin

(dī-ŏk′sĭn)
n.
Any of several carcinogenic, mutagenic, and teratogenic polychlorinated heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that can occur as impurities in petroleum-derived herbicides and as byproducts of manufacturing chemicals and burning fuels and waste.

dioxin

[dī·ok′sin]
a contaminant of the herbicide 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid, widely used throughout the world in forestry, on grassland, against woody shrubs and trees on industrial sites, and for rice and sugarcane weed control. Because of its toxicity it is no longer manufactured in the United States. Exposure to dioxin is associated with chloracne and porphyria cutanea tarda. Dioxin was a contaminant of the jungle defoliant Agent Orange sprayed by the U.S. military aircraft over areas of Southeast Asia from 1965 to 1970. Also called 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-para-dioxin.
Any of a family of highly toxic chlorinated hydrocarbons in which 2 benzene rings are linked by 2 O2 atoms, which includes dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans
Lab Increased PT, increased lipid levels

dioxin

Toxicology Any of a family of highly toxic chlorinated hydrocarbons Clinical In humans, intense chronic exposure causes weight loss, myalgias, insomnia, dyspnea, cold intolerance, irritability, peripheral neuropathy, hepatomegaly, hemorrhagic cystitis, chloracne, actinic elastosis, loss of libido, impotence Lab ↑ PT, ↑ lipid levels. See Agent Orange, Times Beach.

di·ox·in

(dī-ok'sin, dī-ok'sin)
1. A ring consisting of two oxygen atoms, four CH groups, and two double bonds; the positions of the oxygen atoms are specified by prefixes, as in 1,4-dioxin.
2. A contaminant in the herbicide, 2,4,5-T; its potential toxicity, carcinogenicity, and teratogenicity are controversial.

dioxin

a chemical byproduct of the manufacture of certain herbicides and bactericides, particularly tetrachlorodibenzo-paradioxin (TCDD), which is extremely toxic.

Dioxin

A toxic chemical found in weed killers that has been linked to the development of endometriosis.
Mentioned in: Endometriosis

dioxin

a highly toxic and teratogenic chlorinated hydrocarbon that is a trace contaminant in the herbicide 2,4,5-T. Acute poisoning causes vomiting, abortion, anestrus. Chronic poisoning causes liver damage, especially in dogs. Congenital defects caused include cranio-facial deformity and anasarca. It is excreted in the milk.
References in periodicals archive ?
To estimate the effect of the dioxin crisis on the number of Campylobacter infections, a model was designed by which the number of expected cases for 1999 could be calculated.
The CEOs told Reilly they wanted the EPA to launch a new study, one taking account of "important new information" that just happened to suggest that dioxin was less dangerous than previously believed.
Dioxin is any of a group of chemical compounds produced as a byproduct in the production of agents such as herbicides and disinfectants.
Given that these processes may release dioxins into the atmosphere, EPA also began to consider, 7 years ago, the possible importance of air pollution in the dioxin contamination of forage and other livestock feeds.
Anthony Steward added, "We expect CerOx will play a major role in reducing dioxin emissions into our environment by replacing the offsite transportation and incineration of hazardous wastes with safe, onsite, treatment systems.
More people are living more affluently, stoking the industrial engines that produce dioxin and other pollutants.
Dioxin is released into the waste water, although the amounts have declined because most plants no longer use free chlorine.
Haraguchi's team examined levels of dioxins as well as dibenzofuran and coplanar polychlorinated biphenyl, which have a toxicity similar to that of dioxins, in 38 types of whale and dolphin meat that were sold in Japan last year and earlier this year.
Michalek, the Air Force project leader, himself told New York Times science writer Gina Kolata, "We know diabetes is highly related to body fat, and so is dioxin.
Scientists outside the Agency who disagree with these recommendations focus on numerous issues, but two of their key concerns are: 1) data that supposedly links dioxin to adverse effects in humans, especially cancer, is primarily based on animal studies (as well as a few instances where humans were exposed to abnormally large amounts of dioxin) and such a link cannot be made without long-term, human epidemiological studies; and 2) EPA has relied on "Toxicity Equivalents" and "Toxicity Equivalent Factors" to weigh human health risks for all other dioxins against those estimated to exist for TCDD.
The EPA can't produce a simple list of sites it has checked for dioxin.
A CFS spokesman said, "Same as past practice, the CFS has collected hairy crab samples for testing (including dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs) at the import and retail levels to check if the products comply with local legal requirements and are fit for consumption.