dilute

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dilute

 [di-lo̳t´]
to make a mixture or solution less concentrated by adding a fluid.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·lute (dil.),

(dī-lūt'),
1. To reduce a solution or mixture in concentration, strength, quality, or purity.
2. Diluted; denoting a solution or mixture so effected.
[L. di-luo, to wash away, dilute]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dilute

verb To weaken the potency of a factor or chemical in a solution by adding more solute, vehicle or diluent.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

dilute

verb To weaken the potency of a thing by adding more vehicle or diluent. See Single molecular dilution.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

di·lute

(di-lūt')
1. To reduce the concentration, strength, quality, or purity of a solution or mixture.
2. Diluted; denoting a solution or mixture so altered.
[L. di-luo, to wash away, dilute]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dilute

to make a substance less concentrated by the addition of water or other solvent.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Dilute

A solution that has comparatively more fluid in it, relative to the quantity of solute.
Mentioned in: Diabetes Insipidus
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·lute

(dil.) (di-lūt')
1. To reduce a solution or mixture in concentration, strength, quality, or purity.
2. Diluted; denoting a solution or mixture so effected.
[L. di-luo, to wash away, dilute]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Commercial Auto 2017 Commercial Auto Net Premiums Written Number of Carriers (US$ billions) Superior Performers 21 $11 Investors 10 3 Value Diluters 6 1 Study Total 37 15 2012-2017 Average Ratios (%) (%) LOSS & LAE Superior Performers 73% 71.3 Investors 20 81.8 Value Diluters 7 79.8 Study Total 100 78.2 Underwriting Expense Combined (*) Superior Performers 27.1 98.5 Investors 32 113.8 Value Diluters 33.7 113.5 Study Total 29.4 107.7 (*) Includes policyholder dividends Source: ACORD research using A.M.
(9) Exhibit 13 reveals that high diluters are smaller companies in 1991, whether we measure size using log(sales) or log(total assets).
Exhibit 12 reveals that for seven of the industries, the median size of the firm in 1991, measured by log(sales), is lower for high diluters. This result also holds when using total assets as a measure of size, with eight of the nine industries having lower size in 1991 associated with higher dilution.
For example, in 1991 median total assets for low diluters was $692 million, while the same figure for high diluters is $391 million.
Exhibit 14 reveals that the median total assets grew much faster for high diluters than for low diluters.
(10) While all major groupings experience an upward trend, the trend for high diluters is more pronounced.
Additionally, in all industries and for both measures of growth, the median for the high diluters is greater than the median level of growth for the low diluters.
Consistent with our expectations, high diluters are not as profitable as low diluters.
Glucose is a major naturally occurring energy source for animal cells that may be used as energy supplement in diluter for the continuation of metabolic activities and functioning in liquid state (Akhter, 2006).
Powdered skimmed milk (SKIMZ(r); CANDIA) 10% (w/v) without glucose supplementation was used for preparation of diluter, as control.
Some courts have taken the easy way out by summarily finding (or not finding) fame without engaging in much analysis.(77) Other courts erroneously apply the inherent distinctiveness or secondary meaning analysis under section 43(a) of the Lanham Act to the fame analysis under the Dilution Act.(78) Some courts go so far as to conclude that a mark has been diluted without evaluating how the mark has been diluted and the degree of such dilution.(79) As noted above, the Fourth Circuit has declared that the Dilution Act requires trademark owners to show actual economic harm incurred by the famous mark due to the diluter's use of the junior mark.(80)