diluent

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diluent

 [dil´u-ent]
1. diluting or rendering less potent or irritant.
2. an agent that so acts.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dil·u·ent

(dīl'yū'ent), Avoid the incorrect forms dilutent and dilutant.
1. Ingredient in a medicinal preparation that lacks pharmacologic activity but is pharmaceutically necessary or desirable. In tablet or capsule dosage forms, this may be lactose or starch; it is particularly useful in increasing the bulk of potent drug substances with a mass too small for dosage to allow manufacture or administration. May be a liquid for the dissolution of drug(s) to be injected, ingested, or inhaled.
2. Denoting that which dilutes; the diluting agent.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dil·u·ent

(dil'yū-ĕnt)
1. Ingredient in a medicinal preparation that lacks pharmacologic activity but is pharmaceutically necessary or desirable. May be a liquid for the dissolution of drugs to be injected, ingested, or inhaled.
2. Diluting; denoting that which dilutes. usage note Often misspelled dilutent, or erroneously so pronounced.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

dil·u·ent

(dil'yū'ĕnt, dilyĕ-wĕnt) Avoid the incorrect forms dilutent and dilutant.
Ingredient in a medicinal preparation that lacks pharmacologic activity but is pharmaceutically necessary or desirable.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Food Grade Ink products will contain only materials and dilutants listed in 21 CFR chapter 1, Section 73.1 (b), or ingredients 'generally recognised as safe' by the FDA.
They are poorly soluble in water and can usually be isolated from a lichen by organic dilutants (Otzurk et al.
GAO also found that drug masking products such as adulterants, dilutants, and substitutes were widely available on the Internet.
Its adjuvants are generally considered dilutants for regulatory purposes.
Remember that application dilutants are biologically inactive and serve only to provide additional solution volume to achieve adequate nebulizer output.