dilator

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dilator

 [di-la´ter]
a structure (muscle) that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr), This abridgment of dilatator is not correct Latin and is not recognized in TA.
1. An instrument designed to enlarge a hollow structure or opening.
See also: bougie.
2. A muscle that pulls open an orifice.
See also: bougie.
3. A substance that causes dilation or enlargement of an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.
See also: bougie.
Synonym(s): dilatator

dilator

/di·la·tor/ (di-lāt´er)
1. a structure that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

dilator

(dī-lā′tər, dī′lā′-, dĭ-lā′-)
n.
1. A muscle that dilates a body part, such as a blood vessel or the pupil of the eye.
2. An instrument that dilates a body part, such as a cavity, canal, or orifice.

dilator

[dī′lātər]
Etymology: L, dilatare, to widen
a device for expanding a body opening or cavity. Examples include a tent dilator, consisting of a sponge or bundle of seaweed that expands the cervical os, and a Barnes' bag (dilator), a rubber bag that can be inserted into a body cavity and filled with water to produce pressure on the cavity walls.

dilator

Therapeutics A device used to stretch/enlarge an opening or tubular structure–eg, esophagus, to allow the passage of food. See Bougienage.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr)
1. An instrument designed for enlarging a hollow structure or opening.
2. A muscle that pulls open an orifice.
3. A substance that causes dilation or enlargement of an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.

dilator

Any instrument used to widen or enlarge an opening, orifice or passage. Dilators are extensively used in surgery.

dilator

  1. a muscle whose contraction opens an aperture or orifice; an example is the dilator muscle of the eye.
  2. a drug whose effect is the expansion of a structure.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr)
See: dilatator.

dilator

a structure (muscle) that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

dilator pupillae muscle
dilator muscle of the pupil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since mouth guards, mandatory or recommended for protection in many sports, create an oral obstruction to breathing, the idea that they can negatively impact performance has justified the use of nasal dilators by athletes (21).
KEY WORDS: Balloon dilators, Fascial dilators, Upper urinary tract calculi, Security, Efficiency.
After the placement of the guide catheter, tract was created by first dilating using a 6F Amplatz dilator set, then with one-shot method by using 25-30F dilator.
It was found transmitting the lesser axial force to a target when compared to that of balloon and Amplatz dilators.
Our study is in keeping with the body of evidence that balloon dilators are superior to ASDs (6,7,9,13,14) and by having similar indications and similar stone volumes, has reduced the bias of the CROES study.
A preliminary study of sickle-cell patients with pulmonary hypertension suggests that they can benefit from sildenafil, a blood vessel dilator marketed as the impotence drug Viagra by the New York--based drug company Pfizer.
Patients are given three sizes of dilators and are advised to use dilation therapy for 5 min/day for up to 3 years.
This refrain seems slightly off key to me given the gruesome details he recounts of the nature of spa treatments, colonic irrigation, rectal dilators et al.
The exercise protocol consisted of single blind, random-order testing with active and placebo nasal dilators in place.
Sexual intercourse and dilator use can lengthen the vagina, as can dilator therapy.