dilator

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dilator

 [di-la´ter]
a structure (muscle) that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr), This abridgment of dilatator is not correct Latin and is not recognized in TA.
1. An instrument designed to enlarge a hollow structure or opening.
See also: bougie.
2. A muscle that pulls open an orifice.
See also: bougie.
3. A substance that causes dilation or enlargement of an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.
See also: bougie.
Synonym(s): dilatator

dilator

(dī-lā′tər, dī′lā′-, dĭ-lā′-)
n.
1. A muscle that dilates a body part, such as a blood vessel or the pupil of the eye.
2. An instrument that dilates a body part, such as a cavity, canal, or orifice.

dilator

Therapeutics A device used to stretch/enlarge an opening or tubular structure–eg, esophagus, to allow the passage of food. See Bougienage.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr)
1. An instrument designed for enlarging a hollow structure or opening.
2. A muscle that pulls open an orifice.
3. A substance that causes dilation or enlargement of an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.

dilator

Any instrument used to widen or enlarge an opening, orifice or passage. Dilators are extensively used in surgery.

dilator

  1. a muscle whose contraction opens an aperture or orifice; an example is the dilator muscle of the eye.
  2. a drug whose effect is the expansion of a structure.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr)
See: dilatator.
References in periodicals archive ?
Topical pharmacologic agents such as cocaine, phenylephrine, apraclonidine, or hydroxyamphetamine can be used to confirm a diagnosis of HS.[21] Cocaine acts by blocking the reuptake of norepinephrine in the neuromuscular junction of the iris dilator muscle, causing the pupil in a normal eye to dilate, while incomplete dilation is seen in HS.[21],[27]
OSA represents the most extreme degree of lack of compensation for increased upper airway resistance, and it is characterized by upper airway collapse uncompensated by dilator muscle action.
Van de Graaff then hyperventilated seven of the dogs to induce apneas (i.e., the dogs had no dilator muscle activity), During the apneic episode, he stimulated the dogs' phrenic nerve to trigger diaphragmatic contractions; each contraction caused the dog to inhale.
Imaging studies during wakefulness, however, are complicated to interpret since ongoing pharyngeal dilator muscle activity (greater in OSA than controls (59)) may lead to observed differences between groups based on non anatomical (i.e., neuromuscular) factors.
Patients with OSA have increased pharyngeal dilator muscle activity (as a percentage of maximum) versus matched controls (59) that has been interpreted as evidence for neuromuscular protective compensatory reflexes in response to anatomical compromise in OSA.
Multiple factors can influence output from the hypoglossal motor nucleus to the major upper airway dilator muscle (the genioglossus) (70-76).
For example, a hypnotic agent provided to OSA patients with a low arousal threshold but recruitable upper airway muscles may allow enough time for C[O.sub.2] and negative pressure to accumulate sufficiently to augment dilator muscle activity yielding improvements in pharyngeal patency.