dilator


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dilator

 [di-la´ter]
a structure (muscle) that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr), This abridgment of dilatator is not correct Latin and is not recognized in TA.
1. An instrument designed to enlarge a hollow structure or opening.
See also: bougie.
2. A muscle that pulls open an orifice.
See also: bougie.
3. A substance that causes dilation or enlargement of an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.
See also: bougie.
Synonym(s): dilatator

dilator

/di·la·tor/ (di-lāt´er)
1. a structure that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

dilator

(dī-lā′tər, dī′lā′-, dĭ-lā′-)
n.
1. A muscle that dilates a body part, such as a blood vessel or the pupil of the eye.
2. An instrument that dilates a body part, such as a cavity, canal, or orifice.

dilator

[dī′lātər]
Etymology: L, dilatare, to widen
a device for expanding a body opening or cavity. Examples include a tent dilator, consisting of a sponge or bundle of seaweed that expands the cervical os, and a Barnes' bag (dilator), a rubber bag that can be inserted into a body cavity and filled with water to produce pressure on the cavity walls.

dilator

Therapeutics A device used to stretch/enlarge an opening or tubular structure–eg, esophagus, to allow the passage of food. See Bougienage.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr)
1. An instrument designed for enlarging a hollow structure or opening.
2. A muscle that pulls open an orifice.
3. A substance that causes dilation or enlargement of an opening or the lumen of a hollow structure.

dilator

Any instrument used to widen or enlarge an opening, orifice or passage. Dilators are extensively used in surgery.

dilator

  1. a muscle whose contraction opens an aperture or orifice; an example is the dilator muscle of the eye.
  2. a drug whose effect is the expansion of a structure.

di·la·tor

(dī'lā-tŏr)
See: dilatator.

dilator

a structure (muscle) that dilates, or an instrument used to dilate.

dilator pupillae muscle
dilator muscle of the pupil.
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusion: Balloon dilators had shorter operation time, less bleeding, higher success rate of first expansion, less postoperative complications and shorter postoperative hospitalization than fascial dilators in PCNL.
The tract dilatation step in PCNL is very vital because this can result in bleeding so selecting an appropriate dilator system is required.
The aim of our pilot study was to document our experiences comparing a single-step balloon dilator (Pathway) with ASD.
The CRE Wireguided Balloon Dilator is made of the Pebax material and is designed to deliver three distinct, pressure-controlled diameters in a single balloon, allowing gradual dilation of strictures.
The 100 million snorers in the United States are the market for Silent Snooz Nasal Dilators from Incredible Scents Inc.
When the dilator is advanced over the catheter onto the guidewire, the guidewire alone does not provide enough support to keep the dilator within the trachea, and this lack of support predisposes to perforation of the posterior tracheal wall.
She was in agony when doctors left a vaginal dilator inside her after the procedure.
Taking deep breaths helps transport a potent lung and blood vessel dilator called nitric oxide from nasal passages to your lungs.
It also raised dilator reserve by 83% in ischemic areas without affecting dilator reserve in normal areas.