dilation and extraction


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dilation and extraction (D&E),

a form of abortion in which the cervix is dilated and the fetus extracted in pieces using surgical forceps; technique used to complete a second trimester spontaneous abortion or as a form of induced abortion.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dilation and extraction

The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

di·la·tion and ex·trac·tion

(dī-lā'shŭn ek-strak'shŭn)
A form of abortion in which the cervix is dilated and the fetus extracted in pieces using surgical forceps; technique used to complete a second trimester spontaneous abortion or as a form of induced abortion.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A core goal of the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act was to codify the emotional language of abortion opponents and overcome the clinical detachment of medical terms such as dilation and extraction. The closer congressional abortion opponents could bring the image of partial-birth abortion to infanticide, the better.
But extending a ban beyond the dilation and extraction procedure is part of the strategy of anti-abortion forces.
Neither side discussed alternatives to intact dilation and extraction that can sound equally gruesome, such as internal dismemberment of the fetus.
Writing the court's majority opinion; Justice Anthony Kennedy described in detail the procedure in question, also known as an intact dilation and extraction. A woman undergoes about three days of forceful dilation of the cervix so as to deliver the fetus feet-first except for the head, which remains inside the birth canal until it is collapsed by the abortion doctor, upon which the contents of the skull are usually suctioned out, and the now dead body completely removed from the woman's body.
The law is aimed at banning what doctors identify as intact dilation and extraction (D&X), which is used most often between twelve and twenty weeks and occasionally after twenty weeks of pregnancy, depending on the physician's determination of the best way to terminate a problem pregnancy with the woman's health interest in mind.
Thompson ruled that New Jersey legislation barring the specific procedure known in medical circles as intact dilation and extraction threatened the right of U.S.
His comment implied that all of them had been deliberately dishonest about the frequency and reasons that procedures like intact dilation and extraction -- the medical terminology for what pro-lifers call "partial-birth abortions" -- are performed.
And, as NRLC Legislative Director Douglas Johnson recently noted, "This widely used medical dictionary does NOT list the pseudo-medical jargon terms that pro-abortion groups insist are the proper `medical' terms for the method - - `dilation and extraction,' `intact dilation and evacuation,' or `intact dilation and extraction.'"
Carhart that Nebraska's law prohibiting so-called partial-birth abortion is unconstitutional because it doesn't contain a health exception for dilation and evacuation (D&E) or dilation and extraction (D&X) procedures sometimes used in terminating pregnancies after sixteen weeks or so.
No, the act that Congress and President Bush would ban is "a late-term abortion." It's "a type of late-middle and late-term abortion." It's a "type of abortion." It's "an abortion procedure" or "a certain abortion procedure." It is, you see, "a procedure doctors call `intact dilation and extraction.' "
Finally, Coreen's increasing health problems forced them to accept the advice of numerous medical experts that the intact dilation and extraction (D&X) was, indeed, the best option for Coreen's own health, and the abortion was performed.
It focused on the issues the Court had decided to accept for review: (1) does Nebraska's ban apply only to the intact dilation and extraction procedure (abbreviated "D&X" - - i.e., partial-birth abortion) ; and (2) does this ban impose an "undue burden" on the abortion right?