dilaceration


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dilaceration

 [di-las″er-a´shun]
a tearing apart, as of a cataract. In dentistry, an abnormal angulation or curve in the root or crown of a formed tooth.

di·lac·er·a·tion

(dī-las'er-ā'shŭn),
Displacement of some portion of a developing tooth, which is then further developed in its new relation, resulting in a tooth with sharply angulated root(s).
[L. di-lacero, pp. laceratus, to tear in pieces, fr. lacer, mangled]

dilaceration

/di·lac·er·a·tion/ (di-las″er-a´shun) a tearing apart, as of a cataract. In dentistry, an abnormal angulation or curve in the root or crown of a formed tooth.

dilaceration

[dī·las′ərā′shən]
Etymology: L. di-, apart or through + lacerare, to tear
1 a tearing apart, as of a cataract.
2 (in dentistry) a condition resulting from injury to a tooth during its developmental period or as a result of insufficient space for a tooth to develop, with a crease or band at the junction of the crown and root, or with tortuous roots having abnormal curvatures. Not to be confused with normal root curvature.
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Dilaceration

di·lac·er·a·tion

(dī-las'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
Displacement of some portion of a developing tooth, which is then further developed in its new relation, so that its root or crown is sharply angulated.

di·lac·er·a·tion

(dī-las'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
Displacement of some portion of a developing tooth, which is then further developed in its new relation.

dilaceration (dīlas´ərā´shən),

n a severe angular distortion in the root of a tooth or at the junction of the root and crown. It results from trauma during tooth development.

dilaceration

a tearing apart, as of a cataract. In dentistry, an abnormal angulation or curve in the root or crown of a formed tooth.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Full-mouth rehabilitation was undertaken but later, in the permanent dentition, the patient was diagnosed with dilaceration of the maxillary left permanent central incisor, severely crowded maxillary dentition and palatally displaced second premolars (Figure 5a).
Unexpectedly, in the present study radiographic examination did not reveal developmental cysts, root dilacerations, or impacted teeth (except for an upper canine in one subject).