digital subtraction angiography


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angiography

 [an″je-og´rah-fe]
radiography of vessels of the body after injection of contrast material; see also arteriography, lymphangiography, and phlebography. Called also vasography.
digital subtraction angiography radiographic visualization of blood vessels, with images produced by subtracting background structures and enhancing the contrast of those areas that change in density between a preliminary “mask” image and subsequent images.

dig·i·tal sub·trac·tion an·gi·og·ra·phy (DSA),

computer-assisted radiographic angiography that permits visualization of vascular structures without superimposed bone and soft tissue densities; subtraction of images made before and after contrast injection removes structures not enhanced by the contrast medium. Other image processing can be performed. Contrast material may be injected intravenously or in a lower-than-usual amount intraarterially.

digital subtraction angiography

Radiology A diagnostic technique that uses video equipment and computers to enhance images obtained with conventional angiography

dig·i·tal sub·trac·tion an·gi·og·ra·phy

(DSA) (dij'i-tăl sŭb-trak'shŭn an'jē-og'ră-fē)
Computer-assisted radiographic angiography permitting visualization of vascular structures without superimposed bone and soft tissue density; images made before and after contrast injection allow subtraction (separation and removal) of opacities not enhanced by the contrast medium Other image-processing can be performed. Contrast material may be injected intravenously or in lower-than-usual amounts intraarterially.
See: digital radiography

digital subtraction angiography

A method of imaging blood vessels that eliminates unwanted detail. Two digitized images are made, before and after injecting a radio-opaque dye. A negative image of one is then combined with the other, so that only differences between the two show up-in this case the dye in the vessels.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: FIGURE 3: Digital subtraction angiography showing severe long segment stenosis of right-side iliofemoral arteries.
(8.) Paul J Nederkoorn, Yolanda Vander Graff, Myriam Hunink MG: Duplex ultrasound and magnetic resonance angiography compared with digital subtraction angiography in carotid artery stenosis: A Systematic Review: Stroke 2003;34:1324-1332.
Flak et al., "Multidetector CT angiography of the aortoiliac system and lower extremities: a prospective comparison with digital subtraction angiography," American Journal of Roentgenology, vol.
While digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is still viewed as the gold standard in carotid imaging, noninvasive imaging methods, including resonance angiography (MRA), computed tomography angiography (CTA), and ultrasonography, play an increasing role in the evaluation of carotid artery disease.
CT angiography with Digital subtraction angiography is the gold standard in the diagnosis but venous colour Doppler ultrasound study is also useful for the diagnosis of venous aneurysm.
Computed tomography angiography (CTA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) showed a total obstruction in the right MCA with moyamoya phenomenon at distal trunks and a protruding lesion in the left MCA bifurcation.
Although its invasive nature and requirement for ionizing radiation significantly limit its role, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is regarded as the gold standard technique in the evaluation of vascular structures.
Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) was irst introduced in 1980 as a direct method of vessel caliber assessment.
Physicians can now create a digital subtraction angiography at any time without having to use the touchscreen interface.
The unit is coupled to a Vital diagnostic workstation which allows for 3D imaging and digital subtraction angiography. This technology has been absent in the health sector up until now.
Conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA), although diagnostic in its demonstration of the vascular anomalies, has largely been replaced by CTA and MRA.
Conventional angiography and digital subtraction angiography failed to pick multiple vessels in 31% of the grafts1.

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