coefficient

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coefficient

 [ko″ĕ-fish´ent]
1. an expression of the change or effect produced by the variation in certain variables, or of the ratio between two different quantities.
2. in chemistry, a number or figure put before a chemical formula to indicate how many times the formula is to be multiplied.
Bunsen coefficient the number of milliliters of gas dissolved in a milliliter of liquid at atmospheric pressure (760 mm Hg) and a specified temperature. Symbol, α.
confidence coefficient the probability that a confidence interval will contain the true value of the population parameter. For example, if the confidence coefficient is 0.95, 95 per cent of the confidence intervals so calculated for a large number of random samples would contain the parameter.
correlation coefficient a numerical value that indicates the degree and direction of relationship between two variables; the coefficients range in value from +1.00 (perfect positive relationship) to 0.00 (no relationship) to −1.00 (perfect negative or inverse relationship).
diffusion coefficient see diffusion coefficient.
coefficient of digestibility the proportion of a food that is digested compared to what is absorbed, expressed as a percentage.
dilution coefficient a number that expresses the effectiveness of a disinfectant for a given organism. It is calculated by the equation tcn = k, where t is the time required for killing all organisms, c is the concentration of disinfectant, n is the dilution coefficient, and k is a constant. A low coefficient indicates the disinfectant is effective at a low concentration.
linear absorption coefficient the fraction of a beam of radiation absorbed per unit thickness of absorber.
mass absorption coefficient the linear absorption coefficient divided by the density of the absorber.
phenol coefficient see phenol coefficient.
sedimentation coefficient the velocity at which a particle sediments in a centrifuge divided by the applied centrifugal field, the result having units of time (velocity divided by acceleration), usually expressed in Svedberg units (S), which equal 10−13 second. Sedimentation coefficients are used to characterize the size of macromolecules; they increase with increasing mass and density and are higher for globular than for fibrous particles.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

co·ef·fi·cient

(kō'ĕ-fish'ĕnt),
1. The expression of the amount or degree of any quality possessed by a substance, or of the degree of physical or chemical change normally occurring in that substance under stated conditions.
2. The ratio or factor that relates a quantity observed under one set of conditions to that observed under standard conditions, usually when all variables are either 1 or a simple power of 10.
[L. co- + efficio (exfacio), to accomplish]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

coefficient

Vox populi A variable or factor which allows the calculation of a property or quantity of a substance under various conditions. See Absorption coefficient, Activity coefficient, Adsorption coefficient, Attenuation coefficient, Dice coefficient of similarity, Inbreeding coefficient, Intraclass correlation coefficient, Mass attentuation coefficient, Mass energy absorption coefficient, Octanol-water partition coefficient, Spearman's rank (order) correlation.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

co·ef·fi·cient

(kō'ĕ-fish'ĕnt)
1. The expression of the amount or degree of any quality possessed by a substance, or of the degree of physical or chemical change normally occurring in that substance under stated conditions.
2. The ratio or factor that relates a quantity observed under one set of conditions to that observed under standard conditions, usually when all variables are either 1 or a simple power of 10.
[L. co- + efficio (exfacio), to accomplish]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
To evaluate the inclusion of dry protein hydrolysate from tilapia filleting in diets for Nile tilapia larvae, five diets were formulated based on vegetable ingredients, being one control diet without adding TBHP, and four with the inclusion of 2, 0; 4.0; 6.0 and 8.0% of the test ingredient based on test results obtained by digestibility coefficients (Table 2).
The apparent digestibility coefficients (ADC) of dry matter, crude protein and gross energy of the ingredients evaluated for juvenile pirarucus showed significant differences (Table 3).
Determining digestibility coefficients is an important tool in the development of diets to promote good fish nutrition and consequently obtain better responses in terms of weight gain, feed conversion and APRR as well as higher financial returns and lower environmental impacts (ONO et al., 2010; SAKOMURA & ROSTAGNO, 2007).
A comparison of two faecal collection methods for protein and amino acid digestibility coefficients of menhaden fish meal and two grades of poultry by-product meals for market-size sunshine bas (Morone chrysops x M.
Laboratory results were used to calculate digestible energy (DE), metabolizable energy (ME), apparent digestibility coefficients (ADC) of dry matter and nutrients (CP, GE, AEE) of each ingredient by the substitution method, using the equation proposed by MATTERSON et al.
Phytase can improve the digestibility coefficient of calcium in fish but feed ingredients also influences the activity of phytase (Bedford, 2000).
Formulas described by ALMEIDA & STEIN (2011) were used to calculate digestibility coefficients, assuming that P from PS had a digestibility of 92% (ROSTAGNO et al., 2011).
Digestibility coefficients for sunflower meal based diet increased 15.76%, 17.70% and 12.70% for crude protein, crude fat and apparent gross energy as compared to the reference diet, respectively at 1000 FTU kg-1 level.
The digestibility coefficients of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein and nitrogen-free extract significantly decreased as NS meal levels increased, while the digestibility of crude fiber and ether extract increased (Amber et al., 2001).
Nutrient digestibility coefficients were calculated by the difference between the nutrients consumed and voided by the broilers in feces.
Estimation of apparent digestibility coefficient of guar, canola and meat meal for Labeo rohita.