digastric

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digastric

 [di-gas´trik]
1. having two bellies.
2. digastric muscle; see anatomic Table of Muscles in the Appendices.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

di·gas·tric

(dī-gas'trik),
1. Having two bellies; denoting especially a muscle with two fleshy parts separated by an intervening tendinous part. Synonym(s): biventral
2. Relating to the digastric muscle; denoting a fossa or groove with which it is in relation and a nerve supplying its posterior belly.
Synonym(s): digastricus (1)
[G. di-, two, + gastēr, belly]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

digastric

(dī-găs′trĭk) Anatomy
adj.
Having two fleshy ends connected by a thinner tendinous portion. Used of certain muscles.
n.
A muscle of the lower jaw that elevates the hyoid bone and assists in lowering the jaw.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

di·gas·tric

(dī-gas'trik)
1. Having two bellies; denoting especially a muscle with two fleshy parts separated by an intervening tendinous part.
Synonym(s): biventral.
2. Relating to the digastric muscle; denoting a fossa or groove with which it is in relation and a nerve supplying its posterior belly.
See: digastric muscle
[G. di-, two, + gastēr, belly]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

digastric

1. Of a muscle having two bellies connected by a thinner tendinous part.
2. A muscle that acts to open the mouth by moving the jaw bone (mandible) down.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

digastric

  1. (of muscle) having two swollen parts, or bellies, interconnected by a tendon.
  2. a muscle concerned with the swallowing reflex in the human neck.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The importance of this resides on the provoked neural "abnormal muscular reflex behaviors" influenced by chronic muscular-articular-mucosal deep pain toward all the skeletal muscles innervated by this pathway: tongue, intrinsic and extrinsic larynx, pharynx and palatal, tensor and levator veli palatini, some of the styloid process, facial, stapedius (possible stapedial intratimpanic mioclonus), tensor tympani, digastrics, mylohyoid and all the agonist muscles of mastication.