digastric muscle


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Related to digastric muscle: geniohyoid, Stylohyoid muscle

di·gas·tric mus·cle

(dī-gas'trik mŭs'ĕl)
1. One of the suprahyoid group of muscles consisting of two bellies united by a central tendon that is connected to the body of the hyoid bone; origin, by posterior belly from the digastric groove medial to the mastoid process; insertion, by anterior belly into lower border of mandible near midline; action, elevates the hyoid when mandible is fixed; depresses the mandible when hyoid is fixed; nerve supply, posterior belly from facial, anterior belly by nerve to the mylohyoid from the mandibular division of trigeminal.
2. A muscle with two fleshy bellies separated by a fibrous insertion;
Synonym(s): musculus digastricus [TA] .
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

digastric muscle

Neck muscle with two bellies. Origin: anterior belly attaches to the digastric fossa in mandible at base of anterior midline, posterior belly attaches to mastoid process. Insertion: tendon connecting both bellies in a loop of fascia that is attached to hyoid bone. Nerve: anterior belly -- trigeminal (CN V), posterior belly -- facial (CN VII). Action: lowers mandible and raises hyoid bone.
See: neck for illus.
See also: muscle
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
In domestic animals such as cats and dogs, the caudal part is located at the occiptomandibular region of the digastric muscle and in close relation with the mandibular gland, which is easily separable after the removal of the common fibrous capsule.
Anatomical study of the digastric muscle: Variations in the anterior belly.
In the present study, the separation took place over the medial surface of the middle part of the caudal belly of the digastric muscle 2.54.5 cm distal to the ventral pole of the CCG.
(30) The anterior belly of the digastric muscle is elongated with a strip of fascia or by releasing the posterior belly.
The digastric muscle is a suprahyoid muscle formed by two muscle bellies: one anterior and the other posterior.
The nerve courses anteriorly to parallel the mylohyoid muscle, releasing branches that provide motor innervation to the mylohyoid and anterior belly of the digastric muscles (Clark et al., 1999).
* the branch to the posterior belly of the digastric muscle
The results concluded that the lingual artery is found in a position more inferior than classicaly described, based on the digastric muscle and the hypoglossal nerve: and that the hyoid bone can be used as a point of reference for the surgical access to the lingual artery in the region of the anterior trigone of the neck.
Nordstrom, "Asymmetric activation of motor cortex controlling human anterior digastric muscles during speech and target-directed jaw movements," Journal of Neurophysiology, vol.
The lateral pterygoid is the principal opener muscle and also a major contributor to both protrusion and lateral excursion of the mandible.4 Other mandibular depressor muscles include the geniohyoid, mylohyoid, and the digastric muscles. The principal mandibular elevators are the masseter, temporalis and the medial pterygoids.5 Of particular importance are the pterygoids especially the lateral pterygoid that is involved in almost all movements of the TMJ in one way or another and has been the subject of much debate over the years.
The antagonistic response from the digastric muscles pulls the jaw apart.
Comparative anatomic study of mandibular growth in rats after bilateral resections of superficial masseter, posterior temporal, and anterior digastric muscles. J Dent Res.