diffraction

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diffraction

 [dĭ-frak´shun]
the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn),
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

/dif·frac·tion/ (dĭ-frak´shun) the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

diffraction

[difrak′shən]
Etymology: L, dis, opposite of, frangere, to break
the bending and scattering of wavelengths of light or other radiation as the radiation passes around obstacles or through narrow slits. X-ray diffraction is used in the study of the internal structure of cells. See also refraction.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn)
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]

diffraction

deflection of light rays by their passage from one medium into another, e.g. from air into water

diffraction

Deviation of the direction of propagation of a beam of light, which occurs when the light passes the edge of an obstacle such as a diaphragm, the pupil of the eye or a spectacle frame. There are two consequences of this phenomenon. First, the image of a point source cannot be a point image but a diffraction pattern. This pattern depends upon the shape and size of the diaphragm as well as the wavelength of light. Second, a system of close, parallel and equidistant grooves, slits or lines ruled on a polished surface can produce a light spectrum by diffraction. This is called a diffraction grating. See Airy's disc; diffraction fringes; Maurice's theory.

diffraction

the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.

x-ray diffraction
a method used to determine the three-dimensional structure of the single object, e.g. protein molecule, that composes the crystal. Based on recording and analyzing the diffraction pattern of an x-ray beam passing through a crystalline structure, either organic or inorganic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Whenever a thread acting as a prism processor diffracts a message, it doubles its spin time, since this indicates a high load.
Thus, if one could have pairs of tokens collide and then diffract in a coordinated manner one to the left and one to the right, both could leave the balancer without ever having to toggle the shared bit.
This gives any processor that might have read p's PID from prism time to diffract p.
Notice that before accessing the toggle bit or trying to diffract, p clears location[p] using a compare-and-swap operation.
The discovery in 1912 that crystals could diffract x-rays discretely implied either their periodicity or quasiperiodicity.
While periodic and quasiperiodic structures always give discrete diffraction, what other kinds of aperiodic structures diffract (39)?
Scientists have shown that, under certain conditions, they can diffract beams of atoms almost as if they were rays of light.
They demonstrated that a single crystal diffracts electrons in much the same way that it diffracts X rays to create a characteristic pattern of beam intensities.
To produce a hologram, two beams of light overlap in a substance that diffracts light, Meerholz explains.
Under the influence of an electric field, charge carriers moving within the new polymer create light and dark regions, based on how the material diffracts light.
Some of the most breath-taking butterfly colors -- the brilliant and iridescent blues and greens -- emerge from the way light diffracts, refracts and scatters from the layers, lattices and ribbed walls of the scales, Ghiradella points out.