diffraction

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diffraction

 [dĭ-frak´shun]
the bending or breaking up of a ray of light into its component parts.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn),
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

dif·frac·tion

(di-frak'shŭn)
Deflection of the rays of light from a straight line in passing by the edge of an opaque body or in passing an obstacle of about the size of the wavelength of the light.
[L. dif- fringo, pp. -fractus, to break in pieces]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

diffraction

Deviation of the direction of propagation of a beam of light, which occurs when the light passes the edge of an obstacle such as a diaphragm, the pupil of the eye or a spectacle frame. There are two consequences of this phenomenon. First, the image of a point source cannot be a point image but a diffraction pattern. This pattern depends upon the shape and size of the diaphragm as well as the wavelength of light. Second, a system of close, parallel and equidistant grooves, slits or lines ruled on a polished surface can produce a light spectrum by diffraction. This is called a diffraction grating. See Airy's disc; diffraction fringes; Maurice's theory.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
The diffracted power measurement showed that the replicated micromolded gratings had the same response to the IR radiation regardless of the thickness of the coating.
In the absence of glucose, the sensor diffracts 640 run red light (Fig.
If another token arrives, the processor diffracts the two tokens, sending one in a message to the left balancer and the other in a message to the right.
Passing through the windows, the fields can then be diffracted through 90 |degrees~ by the window frame, and thereby propagate vertically along the face of the building, At windows on other floors, the field diffracts back into the building, finally reaching the receiver.
The method of claim 1, wherein the array of elements comprises an ordered array of particles, and wherein the first cured portion diffracts radiation at a first wavelength and the other cured portion diffracts radiation at another wavelength.
By definition all quasi-periodic objects diffract discretely, even though they are not periodic.
When the diffracted waves meet again, those that are in step with each other will undergo constructive interference, resulting in a bright fringe, while those that are half a step out of phase will undergo destructive interference, resulting in a dark fringe that can be used to delineate an otherwise invisible edge.
They derive from interference patterns created when light diffracts as it passes through a two-dimensional grid.
They demonstrated that a single crystal diffracts electrons in much the same way that it diffracts X rays to create a characteristic pattern of beam intensities.
To produce a hologram, two beams of light overlap in a substance that diffracts light, Meerholz explains.
Some of the most breath-taking butterfly colors -- the brilliant and iridescent blues and greens -- emerge from the way light diffracts, refracts and scatters from the layers, lattices and ribbed walls of the scales, Ghiradella points out.
Light transmitted by the grating is diffracted to each side in a number of 'orders'.