diethylstilbestrol


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diethylstilbestrol

 (DES) [di-eth″il-stil-bes´trol]
a synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen used for palliative treatment of prostatic carcinoma and sometimes advanced breast carcinoma. It was formerly used to relieve vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause, and in primary ovarian failure, female hypogonadism, atrophic vaginitis, kraurosis vulvae, and female castration. Most significantly, however, it was formerly widely used to prevent threatened abortion and premature labor. The female children who were thus exposed to the drug as fetuses have tended to have a variety of cervical abnormalities and an increased risk of clear cell adenocarcinoma of the reproductive tract. Male offspring have sometimes had abnormal genitalia, epididymal cysts, and abnormal semen analyses. Regular examinations and follow-up are indicated for these individuals.

di·eth·yl·stil·bes·trol (DES),

(dī-eth'il-stil-bes'trol), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation diethylstilbesterol.
A synthetic nonsteroidal estrogenic compound. Sometimes used as a postcoital antipregnancy agent to prevent implantation of the fertilized ovum. The first demonstrated transplacental carcinogen responsible for a delayed clear cell vaginal carcinoma in female offspring of mothers who took the drug during pregnancy when the drug was erroneously thought to prevent threatened abortion.
Synonym(s): stilbestrol

diethylstilbestrol

(dī-ĕth′əl-stĭl-bĕs′trôl′, -trōl′)
n. Abbr. DES
A nonsteroidal synthetic drug, C18H20O2, having estrogenic properties and used in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Before 1971 it was prescribed to prevent miscarriage and to treat menstrual disorders but was found to cause vaginal cancer and other reproductive abnormalities in the daughters of pregnant women so treated.

diethylstilbestrol

See DES.

di·eth·yl·stil·bes·trol

(DES) (dī-eth'il-stil-bes'trol)
A synthetic nonsteroidal estrogenic compound; sometimes previously used as a postcoital antipregnancy agent to prevent implantation of the fertilized oocyte. The first demonstrated transplacental carcinogen responsible for a delayed clear-cell vaginal carcinoma in girls born to mothers who took the drug during pregnancy when it was erroneously thought to prevent miscarriage.
Synonym(s): stilboestrol.

Diethylstilbestrol (DES)

This is a synthetic estrogen drug that is used to treat a number of hormonal conditions. However, it causes problems in developing fetuses and should not be taken during pregnancy. From about 1938 to 1971, DES was given to pregnant women because it was thought to prevent miscarriage. Children of women who took the drug during pregnancy are at risk for certain health problems.

di·eth·yl·stil·bes·trol

(DES) (dī-eth'il-stil-bes'trol)
A synthetic nonsteroidal estrogenic compound; formerly used as a postcoital antipregnancy agent to prevent implantation of the fertilized oocyte.
Synonym(s): stilboestrol.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reproductive tract lesions in male mice exposed prenatally to diethylstilbestrol. Science 190:991-992.
Reduced fertility in female mice exposed transplacentally to diethylstilbestrol (DES).
Prenatal diethylstilbestrol exposure in the mouse: effects on ovarian histology and steroidogenesis in vitro.
This phenomenon, often referred to as endocrine disruption, was first realized with the appearance of uterine and vaginal/cervical cancers in young women whose mothers took the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) during pregnancy (Hatch et al.
Clear cell adenocarcinoma of the cervix in second generation young women who are without maternal exposure to diethylstilbestrol: A case report.
We were administered DES (diethylstilbestrol, an oestrogen medication now no longer used), a known carcinogen.
Diethylstilbestrol was obtained from Chengdu West Chemical Industry (China).
THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Diethylstilbestrol (DES)-related clear-cell adenocarcinoma of the vagina and cervix is associated with increased risk of death, even in older women, according to a letter to the editor published in the May 3 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
The patient was initiated on a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue after reviewing data on hormonal manipulation with diethylstilbestrol in the treatment of recurrent priapism.
Development in recent years of YY technology at the Universidad del Papaloapan has led to attempts to optimize the feminization rates, including the use in different trials of the three most important estrogens; estradiol-17p, 17[alpha]-ethynilestradiol and diethylstilbestrol with mixed results (Alcantar-Vazquez et al., 2015; Marin-Ramirez et al., 2016; Juarez-Juarez et al., 2017).
Additional risk factors examined included history of infertility, pelvic inflammatory disease, sexually transmitted disease, intrauterine device placement, and diethylstilbestrol exposure.
Risk factors for cervical cancer are the presence of the human papillomavirus (HPV) or human immunodeficiency virus, a compromised immune system, in utero exposure to diethylstilbestrol (synthetic nonsteroidal used to prevent miscarriage from 1938-71) and/or previous treatments of high-grade precancerous lesions.